This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FEATURE www.businessfirstmagazine.co.uk


15


Eddie Izzard, Ross Noble and Tommy Tiernan


Moran. Without a trace of regret, Mick confesses he could get along very nicely, and make a very nice living, if all he did was carry on promoting top acts like these. But that would be to ignore the very considerable presence of Eddie Izzard.


‘If I didn’t have Eddie, I’d have a quiet life,’ he says. ‘But if I didn’t have Eddie, I wouldn’t have a company.’


BREAKING BARRIERS


Anyone who has followed the career of Eddie Izzard knows there’s a strong political side to him. He supports the Labour Party with money and personal campaigning, but this is more than shallow showbiz radicalism; he intends to stand for parliament, either UK or European, in the next few years. And then there is his very high profile admiration – verging on worship – of


Nelson Mandela, illustrated by his near-flagellatory attempt to run 27 marathons in 27 days across South Africa, a marathon for every year Mandela spent in jail on Robben Island (this after he had successfully completed 43 marathons in 51 days around the UK for Sport Relief in 2009). The South African effort was


postponed after 4 marathons when his body just couldn’t deliver what his heart had promised. He had already earned Mr. Mandela’s gratitude for touring South Africa in support of Mandela’s 46664 foundation, named after his prison number. Izzard is among a number of 46664 ambassadors in the UK, alongside Robert Plant, Annie Lennox, Peter Gabriel, Stephen Fry and many others. At root, he is an idealist who believes in the power of comedy to





Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68