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Artemide


a key factor in the company’s success. Passion and dedication to research and development is also a major factor. This year work will start on gathering all the company roles involved in research and development into a new facility in Pregnana, where Artemide has its headquarters and the Italian plant. The facility will include a new automated warehouse that will be operated around the clock seven days a week and include groundbreaking software. Research and development allows Artemide to introduce over 60 new products and prototypes every year. These products are always at the cutting-edge of design and sustainability using LED options, compatible materials and of top-line quality. In addition to these factors customer satisfaction and communication are key elements for long-term success.


A1:You’ve won some very prestigious awards in the past, what has been the company’s proudest achievement? AB:Artemide has had many achievements due to our hard work and dedication to the research and development in lighting design and technology as well as our commitment to our customers. One of our first awards received was the Compasso d’Oro Design award, which we received in 1967, with the “Eclisse” designed by Vico Magistretti. Our most recent acknowledgement is from one of the most preeminent international design prizes, the Red Dot Design award. Melete, designed by Pio & Tito Toso, Cefiso, designed by Alessandro Pedretti (Studio Rota & partners), and Ippolito, designed by Alessandro Pedretti (Studio Rota & partners), received awards in celebration of their qualitative excellence. All the prizes have been attributed for the product design category, to confirm Artemide's top performance in the quality and design of products.


A1:Artemide products have been involved in some great projects – what has been your favourite project to date? AB:A recent project we had the pleasure of working on was the lighting installation at


A1 Lighting talks to Andrea Barbieri, UK Managing Director at Artemide to find out how the brand continues to grow.


the broad high-prestige shopping area of the Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris. Since 27 March 2012, the project has been implemented through the use of a high number of Mercury appliances, designed by Ross Lovegrove for Artemide. The design is an inspiring suspended cloud, made of light and silver hues that dominate the space. The architect Marc Fidelle explains the background philosophy of the project: “Our goal was to qualify the heart of the airport’s shopping area with a suspended luminous installation in the hall - imposing, yet subtle and poetic. The result was a plastic work capable of relating with space and with the important brands on sale, as well as to establish a visual connection with the entrance to the halls on the lower floor. Our project is perceived as something characterised by its light weight design and the reflections and movements that produce a surprise effect in the shopping area, creating an emotional contrast in the surrounding space. Mercury is a modular system allowing several combinations, and is available with halogen or metal iodide sources. The lighting bodies are made of die-cast aluminium, whereas the reflecting ones are made of an injection-moulded, metallised thermoplastic material.


A1:How are Artemide planning to move forward in the future? AB:Artemide will continue to invest in research and development, communication, marketing and distribution. Artemide distributes in 83 countries and exports 75% of its production. With over 60 mono brand showrooms in major cities, direct presence is very important to Artemide to supply our customers with quality support and customer experience. Maintaining these commitments will help to continue the success of Artemide into the future.


Contact:


Artemide T: +44 (0)20 7631 5200 www.artemide.com


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