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fins and the mast. These state-of-the-art LED luminaires were specifically designed to effectively illuminate the façade from very short setbacks on the tiers, withstand the harsh environmental conditions at the top of the structure, minimise light trespass to adjacent buildings and consume 73% less power than the current solution.


The custom-designed control system provides individual control of each luminaire on the façade, allowing the capability to change colours or implement lighting effects at the press of a button. Presently, the Empire State Building tower lights are limited to 10 possible colours, and take a team several hours to change. With Philips advanced LED technology, the colour palette is drastically increased to over 16 million colour choices, including hard-to-achieve pastel hues. Combined with the inherently controllable nature of the luminaires, the façade will become a living


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canvas that transforms the skyline through dynamic effects and colour-changing capability, while continuing to be a beacon to residents of New York City and the surrounding area. In addition to its signature white lights, thanks to Philips LED technology the façade can quickly and easily change to static colors in honour of special events and organisations.


Through its more than $550 million renovation and modernisation initiative, the Empire State Building has been a leader in energy efficiency and sustainable solutions that deliver value, keeping it at the cutting edge of technology and design. The new lighting upgrade will allow the Empire State Building to continue to differentiate itself in the New York City skyline and maintain its position as “the Real Magic, the Real New York.” Philips is proud to assist the Empire State Building in realising that vision.


Contact


Philips T: +44 (0)845 601 1283 www.lighting.philips.com


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