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Philips Empire State Bright Lights, Big City


Jeff Campbell, Global Director of Architectural Products at Philips Color Kinetics, talks us through a very exciting New York project.


The Empire State Building is one of the World’s Most Famous Offices, and its iconic tower lights are a staple in the NYC skyline, recognising key milestones, events, and holidays. Now the Empire State Building is pushing the boundaries of lighting innovation by partnering with Philips, a world leader in the industry, who has created and will install a state-of-the-art, dynamic lighting system that is unique to the building, and can change the building’s façade and tower lights in real-time. The two organisations have worked together to ensure this new lighting system will deliver light levels similar to the existing lighting it will replace.


Lighting the Empire State Building has long been an aspiration for Philips Color Kinetics. The company has been working for years with the building and its management to develop LED technology


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that could meet the challenges of achieving the right light levels and design for the façade, while keeping true to the building’s identity as the iconic office building of New York’s skyline and building innovation.


As one of the most recognised buildings in the world, with the most iconic and famous tower lights, it was critical to maintain that established identity, while at the same time implementing dynamic control and colour-changing capability. The new lighting system has been designed specifically for the structure and features the most advanced LED, optical and control technology available. Starting at the 72nd and 81st floors of the building, the current 1000W metal halide fixtures will be replaced with Philips Color Kinetics ColorReach Powercore flood lighting fixtures. Additional LED luminaires will replace the fluorescent fixtures at the top of the structure, from the horizontal bands to the


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