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Neighbors Neighbors Donate blood at Faith


Family Church Spirituality PAGE 59


Jimmy’s offers taste of Chicago


A plethora of Fridas Arts PAGE 63


Donations sought for EV child


BY TERI CARNICELLI When Andrew Burkhart of Gilbert was not quite


4 years old, he was diagnosed with cerebral palsy, a movement disorder caused by damage to the brain before, during or soon after birth. But he had struggled with various medical issues almost since birth, receiving medical treatments off and on since he was 4 months old. His parents, Kellie and Andrew Sr., did what most


parents would do – they researched the brain disorder, spoke with several doctors and ultimately found some innovative medical treatments that have helped him improve greatly, according to Kellie. Locally, Andrew, now age 5, visits a naturopath and a


craniopath – who also is a chiropractor. “He has improved greatly under their care,”


Kellie says. “We also took Andrew out of state to get specialized treatments last summer and are going again this summer. Andrew showed great improvements with these treatments and we are praying for the same this year.” Andrew will receive hyperbaric oxygen and bone


CHICAGO TRANSPLANT: “Die-hard” Chicagoan Kerry Kersting owns Jimmy’s of Chicago in Chandler. STSN photo by Debbie Jennings


BY K. M. LANG Homesick for the Windy City? Never been there, but


itching for good food and a place “where everyone knows your name?” Jimmy’s of Chicago, located on the northeast corner


of Pecos and Gilbert roads, has been serving up Chicago- style Italian fare to Midwest natives since 2008, giving them, literally, a taste of home. “Of our regulars, I’d say 75% are from east of the


Mississippi,” says Kerry Kersting, who owns Jimmy’s with his wife, Zalena. “Of that, about half are from Chicago. We have just die-hard, die-hard Chicago people.” Zalena grew up in a Chicago suburb, where her “100% Italian” family has long been in the restaurant business. In Chicago, says Kerry, “you don’t see a whole lot of chain restaurants. On every corner there’s a little restaurant, a little bar. The owners talk to you. It feels more like being at a little get-together than a business. We’re trying to give that feel.” When the Kerstings decided to open an East Valley


eatery, Zalena’s sister and brother-in-law, owners of Jimmy’s Place in Forest Park, IL, agreed to share their family recipes. Jimmy’s makes all its breads and much of its pasta, including ricotta cavatelli, a rich, cheese-based noodle served with creamy vodka sauce. Other menu favorites are lasagna, stuffed mushrooms, braciole with mostaccioli and chicken Vesuvio. Jimmy’s utilizes a red sauce originating in central Italy, and the eatery’s popular pizzas are served Chicago- style, “very, very thin.” Although Jimmy’s stays true to its Midwestern roots, the restaurant does “add an Arizona twist to the Chicago theme,” says Kerry. “We make almost everything spicy if you want it that


way, even our pizza’s red sauce. They don’t do that at Jimmy’s Place in Chicago, although they’ve seen the results we’ve had, and I think they’re going to start.”


SEE Jimmy’s PAGE 50


marrow stem cell treatments in California later this month, at a cost of about $15,000. His parents are still trying to raise money for the trip, and are approximately $2,000 short. Dad Andrew works fulltime teaching math at Hamilton High School in Chandler, and Kellie works from home selling Cookie Lee Fine Fashion Jewelry. “Unfortunately these treatments are not covered by


insurance,” Kellie explains. And at nearly $750 a month for his regular therapies, a second round of specialized treatments was looking too far out of reach. So the family once again took to the web, finding two online venues for fundraising.


ANDREW’S NEED: The parents of Andrew Burkhart of Gilbert are seeking financial help from the community to pay for specialized treatments for his cerebral palsy. Submitted photo


One site, Fans Across America, is based in the East


Valley and allows people to make a tax-deductible donation to the Burkhart family. The money goes toward Andrew’s doctor bills. It can be found at www.fansacrossamerica.org/assist_a_family/ registry/families/families_in_need/andrew_ burkhart_family.php. The other company, The Human Tribe Project,


provides a way for people to purchase a sterling silver or nickel-plated steel “tribe tag” in support of Andrew and the company sends his family 75% of the money from each charm purchased on his behalf. To learn more about Andrew’s tribe tags, visit www. humantribeproject.com/tribes/andrew-burkharts- angel-tribe. For more information about Andrew and his story, go to www.prayforandrew.wordpress.com/about/.


Nearly $50k in aid from Chandler Service Club Influential Chandler women attend club gathering


Where to eat PAGE 75-78


June 2 - 15, 2012


47


WHO’S WHO: Chandler Service Club life members gathered at the spring luncheon including Helene Rusk, Barbara Knox, Joan Saba, Cathy Bua, Barbara Bogle and Halcyon “Hall” Knox. STSN photo


It was a who’s who of long-time Chandler women


at the spring luncheon for the Chandler Service Club, meeting recently at Seville Country Club. They included six of the 17 Club’s life members, with Barbara Bogle, Barbara Knox, Joan Saba, Cathy Bua, Helene Rusk and Halcyon “Hall” Knox, and also in attendance was


active member and Chandler Councilmember Trinity Donovan and sustaining member Joyce Wall, sister of Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny. The group paid tribute to life member Audrey Ryan, who passed away earlier this year.


SEE Chandler Service Club, PAGE 53


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