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28 TASTE OF THE TOWN TASTE OF THE TOWN


W. Smith I was surprised last week to hear a radio


personality say he kiboshed something. Kibosh used as a verb—imagine that. I really appreciate the fl exibility of


English. A word starts out as one part of speech and then users morph it into another. Think about radio or skin. But back to kibosh. I just love the sound


of it—whether you pronounce it kai’ bosh or ki bosh’. And what does it mean? You’ve probably


heard it in the expression “put the kibosh on,” in which it means to put a stop to, block, or forestall. I discovered another defi nition in the


Urban Dictionary, but I’m just getting used to the way kids use “hook up.” I don’t want to deal with how kibosh is used by our wild ones. What I fi nd interesting about kibosh is


its origin. Fact is nobody knows for sure where it came from. We once thought its fi rst written use was by Dickens. Not so, but it does seem to have emerged early in the


editorial@robson.com — June 2012 OF THE MONTH Kibosh


1800s. That’s really all we know. Still, the etymological conjectures fascinate. The Oxford English Dictionary suggests


kibosh came from Hebrew or Yiddish. Maybe it’s from Turkish. In this scenario, the second syllable


(kosh) was slang


for nonsense, based on a Turkish word meaning worthless. Many tend toward a Gaelic origin: Cie


bais (pronounced kee bawsh) or caidhp bhais, meaning death cap, possibly a reference to the black cap a judge wore when pronouncing a death sentence. Or perhaps it’s from Cork County


slang for the Irish word for cabbage (cabaiste, pronounced ki bosh ta). Here’s the explanation for this possible origin. Prior to World War I, many cabbages were auctioned for export


to Germany


from Cork. At the end of each massive auction, a large, hollow, silver cabbage was ceremoniously placed over a real cabbage, and this symbolic action was “putting the cabaiste on it.” I like this way to say the event was at an end. What do you think about our WOTM?


Send your opinion or your own favorite word to sunlakeswotm@yahoo.com. 


The Car Lot Paul Frederic Kacer


This sign on The door ain’t No ghost but I’ll miss the Wide cracks in The pavement And the routine Movement of Metal around This big car lot I’ll miss the hosings That washmen do Making the bright Colors on all the Autos come to life And I’ll miss the Blue skies out here That I see each day As I look up at the Mountains where Wild horses come Down to the fence That borders the Old used car lot On the back forty But this sign on the Door ain’t no ghost Relocating… Sending me off to Life’s new pastures This sign on the Door ain’t no ghost Just the end of my Time working here.


ARBORETUM ____ - continued from page 24


Mountain and the Apache Leap tuff from local geologist Kristen Gholson. June 24 Edible and Medicinal Desert


Plants walk at 8:00 a.m. Ethno-botanist David Morris shares his extensive knowledge of the ways Sonoran desert plants have fed, healed and clothed native peoples for more than 1,000 years. June 23 Butterfl y Walk at 8:30 a.m. Photographer Dave Powell and other volunteers guide Butterfl y Walks seeking colorful “fl owers on the wing” throughout the gardens. 


SUN LAKES SPLASH


W4


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