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Parents urged to think before they park


L


ocal PCSOs and traffic wardens have been patrolling around local schools in a bid to


stop parents putting safety at risk by breaching parking rules. Roads leading up to local schools, such as


School Mead, are becoming blocked by drivers who are resorting to parking on double yellow and zig zag lines. Peter Scott, from Hillside Residents‘


Association, said: ―Sometimes it is even difficult to walk on the paths during the school run as parents are parking anywhere and everywhere. There must be alternatives to this.‖ Sergeant Neil Canning from the Abbots


Langley Safer Neighbourhood Team told My Abbots News: ―This has been an on-going problem and PCSO Emma Coyle has been working hard with the schools to help tackle the issue. So far she has helped the school include the issue in their newsletter and has also been


PCSOs and parking wardens out in the village.


patrolling the area along with a traffic warden.‖ There is also confusion as to which agency


deals with the matter. Sgt Canning said police no longer have the power to issue tickets for parking offences on single and double yellow lines. This is now the responsibility of local authority traffic wardens. Sgt Canning added: ―All we have the power to


do is deal with any obstructions and those cars parked on the school zig zag lines – where the driver would then be fined £30. ―Most importantly though it is down to the


parents to park appropriately. It is their best interest to think about safety particularly if their child attends the same school.‖ Have your say. Email tori@mynewsmag.co.uk. by Tori Giglio


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