This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Getting the best out of boys L


ots of research has gone into the area of boys development and how best to support their


development. The parents‘ role in this is fundamental. We


have put together some top tips for engaging boys based on some of the advice from the ―About Boys‖ parenting course which has been developed by Boys Development Project. ● If you want his attention, touch your son on


the arm. Even if he looks away his ears will open. This isn‘t a grip or a tug, just a touch. ● If you want him to listen to what you say,


deepen your voice and slow down your speech. This is just low and slow, not aggressive or angry. ● Whatever you want him to do, strip it down


to as few words as possible without commentary. If you go from ―I‘ve asked you ten times to put those toys away, you‘re doing my head in‖ to ―toys away please‖. This may seem harsh to you at first, but watch the results. ● Use the right words, Boys take words


literally. If you say ―you can walk on ahead‘‖ without saying ―near enough so you can hear me if I call,‖ he will go further than you want. This will only increase, so get used to it now. ● Boys often see the world as a playground, so


if there are rules they need to be told them, and often more than once. Assume, for example, he doesn‘t know how to behave in a supermarket, so


tell him ―here we walk‖ or ―the trolley is pushed slowly‖. If this sparks your interest please do look to see


if your local children‘s centre is running the ―About Boys training‖. The course is free and available to all mums


living in the Children‘s Centre areas with boys aged 0 to five. To contact Abbots Langley Children‘s Centre call 01923 268105.


76


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108