This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
I


t seems incredible that despite so much rainfall we still have a hosepipe ban and


although the rain shortfall of the last few months has been wiped out the water shortage remains. The last two years were the driest on record


and while river levels have had a short term boost we really need the water underground. Groundwater is at its lowest ever levels in


many areas and is needed to keep rivers flowing. So perhaps frustratingly we are going to have to continue to be very careful with our water use. There are many ways to harvest water. Water


butts can be connected to downpipes to capture water falling in gutters and several can be joined up so that when the first becomes full it overflows into another butt. If you have the space and money, you could install a rainwater harvesting system at your house. This would involve sinking a large tank in your garden, which you could then pave or deck over. This collects water to use in your garden and in the house to flush toilets. Waste water from all sources in a property apart from toilet can be collected by a grey water recycling system, treated and re-used for purposes that do not require drinking water quality. This recycled water can be used to flush toilets, water gardens and sometimes feed washing machines. For more information visit http://www.environment- agency.gov.uk Have you considered switching to a water


meter so that you will only be charged for the water you use in the same way that you only pay for the gas and electricity you use? Water companies tend to install household water meters free of charge. You may find you start


saving money right away but even if this is not the case, you can reduce your bill by changing how y o u u s e water. For more i n f o rma t i o n about having a water meter, contact your water company. A few facts about our water use: The average


person in England and Wales uses 150 litres of water a day. By 2020 the demand for water could increase by 800 million extra litres of water a day. Most of this water is used for washing and


toilet flushing, but it also includes drinking, cooking, car washing and watering the garden. We use almost 50 per cent more water than 25 years ago, partly because of power showers and household appliances. Using hot water in our homes contributes around 35 million tonnes of greenhouse gases a year. The average family uses 500 litres of water a day, that‘s equal to 1.5 tonnes of greenhouse gases a year. If you want to explore ways of saving water


come and see us at our stall at the carnival on 9th June. Finally we will be running our local


community market at the Henderson Hall again on Saturday, July 21, and Saturday, September 22. If you would like to book a table at just £10 please contact me (Ian) via the website home page www.altta.org.uk or telephone 01923 291273. Hope to see you at the carnival!


58


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108