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THE WEIRS TIMES & THE COCHECO TIMES, Thursday, May 17, 2012


Presorted Standard U.S. Postage


CONCORD, NH 03301 Permit No. 177


PAID


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VOLUME 21, NO. 20


THE WEIRS, LAKE WINNIPESAUKEE, N.H., THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012


COMPLIMENTARY


“NIOBE” SITS AGAIN ATOP THE GREAT


WALL OF SANDWICH The information on the history


of Issac Adams, Niobe and the restoration project, was pro- vided by Sandwich Historical Society trustee, Boone Porter, who also hosted the unveiling.


This past Saturday, May 12th,


the Sandwich Historical Society unveiled the “Niobe” statue back on its original perch upon the Great Wall of Sandwich. It had been sitting in broken piec- es since 1941 until last year when its restoration began. The sculpture, believed to


have been cast by Prussian Master Sculptor Moritz Geiss


around 1860, was purchased at the London Industrial Expo- sition of 1862, presumably by Sandwich resident Issac Adams. When he was nineteen, Adams decided to leave Sandwich and resettle in Boston, where there were greater economic opportu- nities. Adams asked his neigh- bors to lend him the coach fare,


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i t i e i EDITORIAL VIEWPOINT r


“LIVE FREE OR DIE” NOW AND ALWAYS


s In 1969, serv-


by Bob Lawton Weirs Times


Founder & Publisher


The restored statue of Niobe, first put upon the Great Wall of Sandwich in 1875 by Sandwich, NH, millionaire Issac Adams. It toppled during a storm in 1941 and, miraculously, all two hundred or so odd pieces were found. It was restored by Adam Nudd Homeyer in 2011 and placed back atop the wall on Little Pond Road last weekend.


ing as a New Hamp s h i r e state legisla- tor, it was my honor to intro- duce the bill that led to our proud state motto “Live Free or Die” replacing the


uninspired “Scenic” on our license plates. The motto, “Live Free or


Die,” embodies all that our state, and our country, is molded on.


BRENDAN SMITH PHOTO In 1777, in the Battle of


Bennington, New Hampshire General John Stark led a rebel force of 2,000 men in stop- ping the British from captur- ing Albany, gaining control of the Hudson River Valley and splitting the American colonies in half. It was a pivotal battle of the Revolutionary War and made Stark New Hampshire’s greatest hero.


In 1809, on


the 32nd anniversary of The Battle, Stark, who couldn’t attend the reunion due to ill health wrote in a letter: “Live Free or Die, Death Is Not The


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