This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Atrium’s lighting solution for the CM Richard Ellis London Head Office is both practical and attractive, making it an appealing workplace.


are seeking the cheapest deals in order to make those payback options work. Nonetheless, the risks of choosing cheaper alternatives shouldn’t be underestimated,” explains Fisher. “Differences in colour consistency, colour quality and lumens per watt each play their part in the overall effectiveness of a lighting solution. In some cases the difference in luminaire efficacy (lm/w) can mean as much as twice as many of the cheaper fixtures are required to light the same space. This will cause increased direct energy usage and indirect energy usage through a significant increase in heat load.”


Making a decision cannot be taken too lightly, it is very important to consider the long-term benefits of efficient lighting solutions. Lighting makes up a considerable amount of energy use in a commercial building, so utilising energy efficient solutions is a key to keeping costs down. This is something that Guy Simmonds, Head of Sustainable Solutions in Europe at Lutron, is well aware of. “The increasing recognition of LED technology within the commercial arena is thanks to its potential energy saving and


sustainability benefits. However, there are still specifics that need to be addressed by lamp, fixture and control manufacturers alike if this technology is to become the next great light success story” explains Simmonds. “Compatibility is a significant factor in the overall performance of the installed scheme. Once a designer is happy with the quality of the luminaire and its LED lamp technology, how do they know it is going to work with the light control system that they are using?” This is a really interesting question, and one that Simmonds hopes designers will take seriously. Getting the right solution is all about ensuring that every aspect of a design solution works together, as Simmonds explains; “One of the complexities is that there are two factors to consider – the compatibility between the LED driver and the control, but also between the driver and the lamp. This is why it is important for whoever specifies to choose a lighting control manufacturer that provides built-in layers of compatibility. At Lutron we not only offer 0-10V control, DALI, switching and phase-adaptive dimming modules, but also Lutron's own digital protocol, EcoSystem to ensure maximum flexibility and reliability for specifiers and installers alike”.


An important factor for consideration with


GE Lighting believe that it is important to strike a balance between a comfortable initial investment, and getting the right solution that will suit long-term.


office lighting is complying with Part L building regulations, which focuses on the conservation of fuel and power. These regulate the lumens per watt that can be used across the building. Despite having to meet these restrictions, lighting ultimately has to be comfortable for employees, as Ian Streeter, Director at Deltalight explains; “Studies have shown that lighting is one of the most important parts of an office’s physical conditions, as good lighting is conducive to efficient working. Professional lighting involves sufficient amount of light, proper distribution, diffusion and absence of glare.” Streeter’s colleague Victoria Clifton, Marketing and PR Manager at Deltalight, believes that the company’s Headliner 75 fitting is the perfect example of combining the use of LEDs and Fluorescent lighting to comply with Part L regulations. This is because the product can house either light source, and it comes in bespoke profile modules to fit within the space to light the designated areas sufficiently.


Lighting needs to be designed to work www.a1lightingmagazine.com 13


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84