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PICTURE POSTCARD RESTAURANT A HIT WITH LOCALS


There can be few more picturesque spice restaurants in the UK than Chatni, a family-run Bangladeshi restaurant in Scotland in the quiet village of Methven, a short drive from Perth. It opened at the end of 2009, replacing a tra- ditional food restaurant, and has quickly established itself as a popular dining experience for local customers as well as attracting many from further afield. The restaurant, in an 18th century detached cottage, is run by Chef Edris and his brother Jahangir who between then have have around 40 years of experience in the industry. They say that are ‘reso- lute in providing uncompromising quality’ in their dishes; meat is locally sourced, spices are ground on the premises, sauces contain a homemade yogurt and everything from breads to bhajis are produced completely from scratch. Being from Chittagong, Edris has a number of specialty dishes on the menu inspired by his South Bangladeshi origins. Masbangla (talipa fish cooked with aubergine and potato) and Freshwater Giant King Prawn are two such examples that have been particularly popular with Chatni regulars. The menu also offers the more familiar classic dishes devel- oped in line with Chatni’s distinctive style and freshness and are available as both vegetarian and non-vegetarian options. Despite its relative infancy, Chatni has received consider- able praise from a number of sources. Most notably, through positive feedback on the public review website Tripadvisor it is now ranked 2nd out of 77 for restaurants in Perthshire.


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A recent review in The Scotland on Sunday also highlighted the quality and inventiveness of the dishes, the comfortable surroundings and attentiveness of the staff.


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