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However, our consumption does not have to continue in this fashion. Nearly all of the detrimental environmental implications of raising meat for food come from factory farming, which now produces over 99 percent of all meat consumed in the US. By avoiding this cheap, mass-produced meat, many of those nasty environmental side affects can be sidestepped and, by eating meat less frequently, the health issues can be avoided as well.


You could start by cutting back on the amount of meat you and your family consume. Begin slowly by planning one meal per day that contains no meat but lots of fruit and vegetables, then kick it up to two meals and possibly even three. Enjoy a flexitarian lifestyle by indulging in local, organic, free-range, and grass- fed meat occasionally.


Support


your local butcher (after finding out where they get their meat from) and look into meat and fish delivery services. There's a lot of options out there when you start looking.


67 | ukhandmade | Spring 2012


To assist you with the possibly difficult and daunting task of transitioning into a flexitarian diet, here’s a stellar salad that's perfect as a lunch, starter, or half of a dinner.


Salads are great for using up veg that's


sitting in the fridge, come


together in just a few minutes, are very healthy and, with the right dressing, are packed full of flavour. If you haven't ventured into the land of lettuce much, you have no idea what you're missing.


Originating in Cyprus, halloumi is


a salty cheese usually made from a mixture of goats' and sheep milk. Renowned for its high melting point, halloumi can be fried or grilled without melting all over the place. In this recipe, its saltiness compliments the sweet and spicy dressing and the herbs, all of which bring together bursts of flavour to the vegetables.


This is a unique and versatile salad that can be altered to include other herbs – think flat leaf parsley, basil, rocket and so on – and also other vegetables, like spring onion, carrot, courgette, and lettuce.


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