This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
such as social isolation, fragmented communities, environmental pollution and climate change.


This is not some esoteric ideal. In the concluding chapter Gauntlett presents some very real future scenarios for how the making-and- doing culture can influence society in the areas of media, education, work, politics and the environment. He concludes ‘Making things shows us that we are powerful, creative agents – people who can really do things that other people can see, learn from, and enjoy. Making things is about transforming materials into something new, but it is also about transforming one’s own sense of self’.


Personally, I have some concerns about the over-intellectualisation of craft, taking it away from its beginnings as a powerful tool of the people - I guess that comes from my DIY roots. As an academic study on creativity this book could be seen as part of the intellectualisation of craft. It is certainly a reflection on the


45 | ukhandmade | Spring 2012


changing status of craft (or ‘making’) in society.


My concern is that through the


mainstream adoption of craft there is a danger that the crafting culture, which Gauntlett calls the ‘making-and-doing culture’, may become homogenised and thereby lose its


power. Additionally by


putting ‘making’ at the forefront of exhibitions such as the ‘Power of Making’ at the V&A might it be alienating it from some of the people we should be connecting with through craft? However, the future scenarios presented by Gauntlett are desirable and attainable.


If you’re part of the making-and- doing culture there’s a good chance you’ll want to read this book. It’s inspiring to read the future scenarios that we could make a reality and that really would be some powerful making.


For more information visit: www.makingisconnecting.org ISBN-10: 0745650023 ISBN-13: 978-0-7456-5002-9


Workshop image courtesy of Menno Stassen


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120