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chocolate until thoroughly covered. You don't want to melt the icing mix so make sure you do it quickly. Place onto the baking parchment and repeat, topping each chocolate with a sprinkle of pink sugar crystals or crystallised rose petals. Leave to set in a cool place.


6. Serve al fresco for high tea or, for gift giving, place in cellophane bags and tie with ribbon.


4. Break the chocolate into even- sized pieces and place in a heat- proof bowl with the groundnut oil. Gently heat a small amount of water in a pan and place the heat-proof bowl containing the chocolate on top. Make sure that the bottom of the bowl is not touching the water or the bottom of the pan. Stir until the chocolate has melted then remove the bowl from the heat and cool for 5 minutes.


14 | ukhandmade | Spring 2012


N.B. Alternatively, if you are impatient like me, melt your chocolate in a heat-proof bowl in the microwave, heating in short bursts and stirring until the desired consistency is reached. Don’t overheat or you’ll burn your chocolate!


5. Line a large flat baking sheet with baking parchment. Using two forks, carefully take a ball of the ‘Rose Cream’ and dip it into the melted


N.B. For a Violet Cream variation, substitute the Rose Water with Violet oil, add a drop of purple food colouring instead of pink and reduce the quantity of icing sugar to 225g/8oz. Coat with a good quality dark chocolate. If Violet Oil proves too difficult to obtain, try a pack of Parma Violets ground down to a fine powder and mixed with your icing sugar instead.


For personal use only Images courtesy of Bebe Bradley


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