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where we worked in the middle of a museum gallery surrounded by the work of the Arts & Crafts movement so it is very much a reciprocal activity as I get so much out of working on these projects.


What is the inspiration behind your mosaics? Inspiration comes from a variety of places but probably the strongest is jewellery-making. It occurred to me that making large roundels of mosaic was very much like a giant gem-set brooch. Early clients were very keen on sparkly mirror and glitter tiles so my direction was steered by my training with gemstones and colour in jewellery-making. I think many crafts people transfer skills and ideas from one craft discipline to another.


I have been lucky to have worked with a number of museums with wonderful Arts & Crafts collections so inevitably there have been influences of Ashbee and his Guild on my work. I often use natural forms and patterns within the designs. I


103 | ukhandmade | Spring 2012


also love the work of Macintosh and the Glasgow School of Art building is one of my favourite sources of ideas.


Inspiring links also come from unexpected places. I was looking at some tablecloths my mother and grandmother embroidered 50 years ago and found the colours and patterns made their way into a mosaic design for a garden wall commission. The most useful bit of technology I now use is the camera


on my phone – something catches my eye and I snap it and take it home to use when I am sketching. I have been surprised at how interested clients are in the design process and often ask for the sketch drawings to keep.


You describe yourself as Maker and Educator, how do you balance both careers? The term maker/educator came from registering on the Craft Council’s


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