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BE PARTNER │ PSA


Is this plan or any part - applicable to other species or ecosystems (thereby creating a precedent for future projects)? As natural habitat becomes increasingly fragmented across the world, connectivity between animal populations is lost, and eventually they may become isolated. Population fragmentation and isolation puts many species at risk. If the populations are small and isolated they could go locally extinct because they are at risk of inbreeding depression (can only breed with close relatives which can lower survival), and at risk of population decline from demographic fluctuations (e.g. skewed sex ratios) and environmental fluctuations (e.g. climate change, hurricanes, drought, disease etc.) from which the population may not recover.


If connectivity between populations is retained, individuals can sometimes move from one population to another, this is good because: inbreeding depression is avoided as unrelated individuals from different populations can breed with each other; skewed sex ratios can be balanced by immigration and emigration; populations which have been lowered by hurricanes, drought, overexploitation etc. can be recolonized and recover. So, connectivity between populations will help to ensure the long-term survival of a species.


What does it mean for you to be a part of this project 'saving the jaguar'?


I have been studying jaguars in Belize since 2003, with my partner and jaguar ecologist Dr Bart Harmsen. For six years we lived in the Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary, the world’s first jaguar preserve: Bart studied jaguars living inside the protected forest, and I studied the jaguars outside the protected forest, in and around farms and villages. In 2009, I started working for Panthera’s Jaguar Corridor Initiative, focused in the Central Belize Corridor. It is a great privilege to study this magnificent species, the largest cat in the western hemisphere, and to use our research to guide conservation strategies.


Learn more about Panthera’s Jaguar Corridor Initiative at: http://www.panthera.org/programs/jaguar/jaguar-corridor-initiative


Panthera’s Jaguar Program Executive Director, Dr. Howard Quigley, collars a jaguar with Panthera’s CEO, Dr. Alan Rabinowitz, in the Brazilian Pantanal. © Steve Winter/Panthera


Special Thanks


Boone Smith www.boonesmithwildcapture.com Rebecca Foster Director Belize Jaguar Program www.belizewildliferesearch.com Feisty Films www.feistyfilms.co.uk National Geographic www.nationalgeographic.com Panthera www.panthera.org Steve Winter www.stevewinterphoto.com


Before man colonized the jaguars habitat, the cat reigned as Lord of the Jungle.


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