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BE PARTNER │ PSA


Your most unforgettable encounter with a Big Cat?


Too many to mention really - but for Angie having Half-Tail the leopard coming to her vehicle when she was our leopard spotter on the first series of Big Cat Diary in 1996 and lay under her car for shade.


Looking down into Half-Tails yellow eyes - calm and inquiring - was a moment she will never forget. We followed Half-Tail from the time she appeared around Leopard Gorge and Fig Tree Ridge it the late 1980s until her death in 1999.


We have just returned from a safari in the Mara watching Zawadi - Half-Tail's daughter - who is now 16 years old and accompanied by a 3.5 month old female cub. Zawadi was back at Leopard Gorge - one of the most beautifully scenic places in the North Mara Conservancy and one of our favorite places to photograph leopards. We have documented Zawadi's life since she was a cub and will continue to follow her whenever we can until she dies.


The longest lived wild leopard we know of was the Mother leopard (as she was known) at Londolozi Game Reserve in South Africa in the 1980s/90s who was killed buy hyenas at the grand old age of 17.


Normally a 12 year old leopard would be considered old and to have done well to survive that long in a place as competitive for large predators as the Mara is. We know Zawadi as well as some of our human friends!


Another unforgettable moment for Jonathan was in 2003 when we were following Kike the cheetah mother with her three 9 month old cubs. Kike was the cheetah that loved to climb on to the bonnet and roof of vehicles - and would sometimes pee or poop on the vehicle just as she would if she was perched on a termite mound - cheetah females mark their home range in this way.


On more than one occasion Kike peed and pooped through Jonathan's roof hatch - much to the amusement of millions of viewers. Jonathan sometimes get stopped in the street and asked "Aren't you the Big Cat Man - the one the cheetah 'crapped' on?" He never imagined he would be famous for much - and certainly not for that!


The Scott’s see their work - books, sets of drawings, television documentaries, photo workshops and public lectures - not just as a way to make a living, but as a means to help draw attention to the planet’s wild creatures and the many threats they now face.


As the conservationist Bernhard Grzimek so rightly said ‘the animals cannot vote’ – others must speak for them.


Jonathan and Angie Scott live in Kenya in Africa and spend much of their time in the company of African wildlife. Their wildlife photography, wildlife pencil drawings, and wildlife books have won awards and recognition for their work throughout the world. A selection of their wildlife pictures are available as fine art prints, and their pen and ink drawings as portfolios of signed limited edition prints. Their stock images are represented by some of the world's top photographic agencies such as Getty Images, NHPA and Heritage Images/ImageState.


The Scott's host wildlife safaris around the globe from Africa to


Antarctica; other favorite destinations are India, Botswana and Namibia. So if you are a interested in nature photography and want to learn more about taking great wildlife photographs then why not sign up for one of their inspirational photographic workshops or an African safari.


Visit the Scott’s online at: www.jonathanangelascott.com


Illustration by Angela Scott from the book “The Marsh Lions”


Illustration by Angela Scott from the book “The Marsh Lions”


Jonathan and Angela Scott


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