This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
greenliving2 Let There Be Light by Richard McGinnis N


The Evanston Environmental Association and the City of Evanston present the inaugural


othing beats an hour or so of yoga, followed by some gentle, contempla- tive meditation. But being Midwest-


erners, constantly in the grip of unpre- dictable weather, we should consider our options when given the opportunity to spend time outside. If you belong to a gym or are thinking about joining one, you can always work out inside. This year, good fortune smiled on us as


winter migrated to spring, and the early appearance of post-hibernating humans in the great outdoors did not go unnoticed.


Perhaps you got out on your bike, walked the dog a bit more or took your meditative mind to the lake, the park or out into the yard. Ever hear of the pineal gland? It is a tiny, rice-grain-sized


Evanston Green Ball Levy Center, 300 Dodge Avenue, Evanston


To Support the Evanston Ecology Center Friday May 18, 7 to 11 pm


Early Bird Ticket price: $50.00 (ends May 4) Regular Ticket price: $55.00


• Local food and drinks • Live music by South Boulevard Band • Green activities including a live auction • Free Parking For tickets and details go to


www.evanstonenvironment.org/greenball.html Archer-Patterson Family Foundation


part of the human brain, located roughly in the center of your head. It is often called the “third eye” and resembles a pinecone (hence pineal), with a mountainous microscopic landscape. One of the few parts of the brain with its own dedicated blood supply, the pineal gland is also photosensi- tive (hence eye) and regulates serotonin and melatonin. It has some other fascinating characteristics that will blow your mind. The pineal gland is a primary player in our physiological


response to seasonal shifts. We want to sleep less because there is more ambient natural light, and we feel happier when the weather is conducive to outside activities. On a primitive level, it helps signal our instincts for planting, hunt- ing, gathering and building up stores of food. You can try to fight those primitive natural urges as


spring unfolds by continuing to work on your dissertation, playing a few more video games or clinging to your DVD collection of Desperate Housewives and gaining a few extra pounds on the couch, but why fight it? Get outside. Tune into that tiny part of your mammalian brain and get your posterior out into the sunlight. The answer to my own persuasive pineal Siren’s call is gardening. Nothing makes me happier and connects me to


44 Chicago North & North Shore www.NAChicagoNorth.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64