This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Actual Patient


Put your smile on!


Ellingsen • Paxton • Johnson orthodontics


extraordinary smiles, extraordinary care!


Orthodontics for Children and Adults


New patients are always welcome, no referral necessary.


Complimentary New Patient Exam


Brain Fitness A


by Dr. Susan Ashley


RECENT SURVEY SHOWED that Alzheimer’s dementia is the most feared disease, second only to cancer, which people


fear developing as they age. Memory does decrease with age; from ages 25-40, there is a 21 percent memory decline, and by age 70-79, the memory decline is 43 percent. This is not inevitable, however, and indeed, memory can be improved as we age. Brain cells continue to form throughout your entire life. The best treatment of dementia is prevention, but there are many things we can do to slow down memory loss and improve memory and attention. There


are over 100 different


neurotransmitters, but the key ones for memory are: acetylcholine, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate and GABA. Each one binds to specific receptors in the brain. With Alzheimer’s, a patient’s immediate and remote memory are not affected at first, but rather their short-term memory is severely diminished. Several genes for Alzheimer’s have been


509.926.0570


VALLEY: 12109 E Broadway Ave, Bldg B SOUTH HILL: 2020 E 29th Ave, Ste 120


www.epjortho.com Two Locations


58 SPOKANE CDA • May • 2012


identified, including ApoE4. Thirty percent of Alzheimer’s patients have ApoE4, but only 10 percent of people with this gene get Alzheimer’s. The younger the onset of Alzhimers, the more likely it is genetic. Head trauma with loss of consciousness doubles risk of Alzheimer’s.


“A man’s real possession is his


memory - in nothing else is he rich, and in nothing else is he poor.” ~ Alexander Smith, Scottish poet


A mothers’ linkage to Alzheimer’s


is greater than the fathers’ by nine to one, meaning most Alzheimer’s is inherited down the mother’s family tree. Interestingly, members of the Cherokee Indian tribes have a natural immunity to Alzheimer’s, and their risk is zero. Blacks and Hispanics have a greater rate, primarily due to an increased risk of diabetes in these ethnic groups. Type 2 diabetes is now called type 3 Alzheimer’s, because the disease increases one’s risk significantly.


Causes So what are some of the causes of


Alzheimer’s and memory impairment? The causes can include the following: Inflammation. This is probably the


most important risk factor; any increased inflammation in the body will increase inflammation in the brain, causing more free-radical production and damage to the hippocampus, which is an area of the brain critical for memory. Things that increase inflammation include diabetes, hypertension, obesity (especially


GOING TO BATTLE AGAINST ALZHEIMER’S AND DEMENTIA


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212