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FIRST LOOK BUZZ


LILACS & LEMONS by Vincent Bozzi


LILACS to Mayor Condon for proposing new water rates that are more understandable and affordable. We don’t really have a water shortage here, and the brown lawns that pep- pered the area were downright ugly. Now most people will be able to keep their lawn green without taking a bank loan to cover the costs.


LEMONS to the Inland Northwest Boy Scouts for surrendering to a big land developer who wants them to swap their waterfront camp land with another site that has no history, ambience, little waterfront access and a ton of wind. When F.W. Fitze donated the land to the scouts in 1929, he stipulated that it should be used forever as a camp. Forever doesn’t mean 83 years. When donations and wills are flouted this way, it makes other well-meaning patrons less likely to make generous donations, hurting all kinds of non-profits in the long run.


LILACS to Bank On Spokane, a group of seven local banks and credit unions, which is looking to bring non-bankworthy people back into the banking fold, allowing them to open accounts, manage their money, and provide a much better option than payday lending places. The banks doing the good deed are: AmericanWest Bank, Ban- ner Bank, Global Credit Union,


Inland Northwest


Bank, Mountain West Bank, State Bank and Washington Trust. This might be a rare case of a bank lending to people who actually need the money!


LEMONS to solicitors who are finding ways to call us on our cell phones. It was only a matter of time before telemarketers started buying and using cell phone lists, but those callers should be penalized. If you’re on vacation and you answer, you get to pay the roaming fee, which won’t generate a lot of goodwill with the company that called.


LILACS to Jerry and Patty Dicker for buying and restoring both the Bing Theatre and the building that the Interplayers Professional Resident Theatre owns. In both cases leaking ceilings are promptly getting repaired, the buildings are being brought up to date, and Spokane can be proud that our performing arts venues are receiving the care they deserve. Now buy some season tickets and help us take our arts community to the next level!


LEMONS to those who don’t RSVP until the last second, if at all. Since we put on about twelve events per year, we have a lot of experience with a Spokane phe- nomenon, widely circulated among party planners, that Spokanites wait until the last minute to buy tickets, often don’t RSVP, or simply check the “Maybe” option on Facebook. To properly gage the amount of food, drinks and seating to provide, planners really need to know if you’re coming, how many you’re bringing, and that you’re really coming if you say you are.


LILACS to local celebrities like Patty Duke, Dennis Franz, Ellen Travolta and Jack Bannon, for really giving back to their local community by performing in local theatre pro- ductions or special events. We’re glad you chose this corner of the world in which to live, and thank you for shining a positive light on our community.


20 SPOKANE CDA • May • 2012 Hot Not • Garage sales! As the


weather (finally) warms up, signs for treasure hunting go up as well.


• Cheap wine. Check out the Rocket Market as they taste every wine they carry and have a Great wine under $10 section that doesn’t disap- point.


• Extreme (online) coupon- ing. Heavy discounts on local business from online coupon sites such as The Deal Planet, Yoller, Living Social and Groupon.


• Adding vintage elements to your home décor. ReSkued, Metro, Lillian Conn, PINK and Artemis are a few local shops that sell restyled home fur- nishings and specialize in a timeless style.


• Filling our landfills with items that can be refur- bished and/or appreciated by someone else.


• Ultra expensive wine. Wash- ington is drenched in great wine at deliciously low pric- es. No need to break the bank on your House Wine.


• Paying full price every time.


0% OFF


• Big Box retailer furniture that you assemble at home. Come on already, who wrote these directions and why do I have left over pieces?


Spoko-Gnome, We have season tickets to the GU Women’s Basketball games,


and after every game I find myself wondering about something. There are police directing traffic after the games. They park their police cars blocking traffic, and then help people cross to the parking lots, and direct the flow of traffic out of the arena and sur- rounding lots. It is very helpful. My question is, am I as a taxpayer paying for that, or is the school footing the bill?


Walt, ~ Walt P. Fear not, b-ball hoop-a-looper named Walt! We


checked with Officer Jennifer DeRuwe, of the Spokane Police Department, who always has an answer when we have a question. She put us in touch with Lauri Lucas, the Spokane City/County Extra Duty Coordina- tor for the police department, and this is what she said: “Gonzaga University pays for five officers and one supervising sergeant for every men’s game and for three officers and one supervising sergeant for each women’s game. Gonzaga University works very closely and very willingly with Spokane Police Department to ensure safe passage for the spec- tators walking to and from the games as well as directing traf- fic for a safe and quick egress.” ~ Spoko-Gnome


SPOKO-GNOME


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