This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BOOK REVIEWS LOCAL BOOK REVIEWS 1.


Remembering the B: The History of the Washington State “B” Basketball Tournament


by Jim Stinson “It’s the most important thing in nearly every small American town:


basketball.” Those aren’t my words; they appear in the moving foreword to this book, and writer Sherman Alexie gets the credit. Alexie played guard for Gene Smith’s Reardon Indians at the State B


tournaments in 1983 and 1985. The team’s failure in 1985, for which he blames himself, still haunts him. The book contains 101 tournaments, or rather 93 “B” and eight


“2B.” “Even though the state B ended in 2006, the records were carried on to the “2B” tournaments,” says Stinson. “This book ends with the 2010 tournament because new formats were started in 2011, making it basically a different game.” Nostalgic in tone, the book should bring back fun and exciting


moments in the lives of old guys who played in the State B or had a dog in the fight. It is delightful to read an anecdote such as the one about the yearly contest between the more knowledgeable fans to see how many mistakes they could find in the “B” program. Definitely a guilty pleasure for basketball junkies, the book contains


pages and pages of trivia and nostalgia, including: schools listed by district, Dr. James Naismith’s original 13 rules, poems about the “B”, Western Union telegrams with “B” invitations, newspaper articles, rule changes over the years, essays on coaches like La Conner’s “one-armed genius” Jack Whittaker, charts of boys and girls records, lists of Century Club members (scorers of at least 100 points in a “B” career), mentions of players like Katie Davis, “Manson’s medical miracle,” and Keith Dyk, who fought a prolonged and courageous battle with cancer The appeal of this book to those interested in the topic will be


the quantity of information, the diversity of information and the attractiveness of its package. I would suggest reading the Forward before dipping in, so readers


168 SPOKANE CDA • May • 2012 2.


by Holly Chase Williams


3.


note style decisions: The Wahkiakum Mules are referred to throughout as Cathlamet, (the name of the school in the 1970s), and Northwest Christian in Colbert is referred to as NWC Spokane, for example. Published by Retired Gorilla Press, hardback, $39.99 Jim Stinson is a basketball fan and retired Davenport High teacher. For 18


years, he coached the Davenport Gorillas in basketball and he also taught English. Stinson and his Gorillas beat St. George’s 67-55 in the 1993 State B finals.


Gunther Schuller: A Life in Pursuit of Music and Beauty by Gunther Schuller


If you hang around Auntie’s Bookstore, you may have seen a distinguished-


looking older man, sometimes in a tuxedo, browsing through the books. You might have heard him conduct the Mass in B Minor at St. John’s Cathedral on the South Hill during the annual Northwest Bach Festival in 2010, or Handel’s Messiah in 2005. You may know he has served as Spokane’s Artistic Director for the Bach Festival since 1993. But did you know that our Mr. Schuller is a MacArthur Foundation “genius


grant” recipient? Or that he is a Pulitzer Prize winner? (1994, for his large- scale orchestral work Of Reminiscences and Reflections.) Born in New York City in 1925, how did such a man make his way clear


across the country to Spokane? That question will be answered (I hope) in the second volume of Schuller’s autobiography. This 550 page volume is only part one of an American success story that could have turned out so differently. Schuller skillfully weaves historical events in with the personal, and how


could he not? His parents, both ethnic Germans, emigrated here (separately) from a country in which the unemployment rate was 45 percent. Inflation was so out of control that a moldy loaf of bread could cost four million Deutsche Marks. At that time, Schuller says, “America was still considered…‘das Land der unberenzten Moglichkeiten.’ The land of unlimited opportunities.’” But before he could set about making the most of them, the young Schuller


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212