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and had an office in downtown. In 1893-94, a plant was built at Clayton in Stevens County. It was probably at that time the operation ceased at the Cannon Hill Park site.


How Cannon Hill Park came about The Adams family, represented by Charles


F. Adams, owned a 60-acre tract surrounding the area of what is now Cannon Hill Park. Adams had plans to develop his surrounding land into a residential area along with the Cannon Hill Company. On February 14, 1908, Charles Adams deeded 13.18 acres to the city of Spokane. This property was specifically donated to the city for a park, which included the clay pit from the old brickyard. In return, the city agreed to improve


the land within one year from the date of this donation. The improvements are not mentioned on the quitclaim deed. Cannon Hill Park, prior to being donated to the city, was called Adams Park in honor of Charles Adams. It was later changed to Cannon Hill Park after Anthony Cannon. When the Olmsted Brothers were in


Spokane in 1908, Aubrey White, Spokane Park Board president, specifically requested they design a park at that site. The park was completed in 1910. The original plan called for two ponds, with the excess water from the numerous springs at Manito Park to be diverted to Cannon Hill Park. Cannon Hill Park had one of the city’s


favorite skating ponds in the winter and wading pools in the summer. The smaller of these ponds, which was located on the west side of the park near 18th


Avenue and Lincoln


Street, is now gone. The only reminder a pond was ever there is a bridge made of basalt rock. Cannon Hill Park is a classic example of an Olmsted Brothers’ design. With the influence of Spokane’s founding


fathers, Aubrey White, the Olmstead Brothers and more, Spokane’s parks and surrounding neighborhoods, together, have helped shape Spokane. The park without the neighborhoods, and the neighborhoods without the parks, would not be as special. The uniqueness comes about when the two shall meet.


This story is excerpted from Spokane Our Early History: Under All Is The Land by Tony and Suzanne Bamonte. To learn more about their publications, visit www. tornadocreekpublications.com.


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