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HISTORY VISITING OUR STORIED PAST


without worrying about his horse. This line marked the beginning of the streetcar era and an area of majority of Spokane’s first palatial homes centered in one geographical area. Many of the homes constructed in this area were designed by Kirtland Cutter, during the late 1800s. Another factor that came into play in Browne’s Addition was the vast


number of people living in this district whose money came from the Coeur d’Alene mining district, whose infancy began in 1883. Also during the early 1900s, a number of people involved in the timber industry also were moving into that neighborhood.


Liberty Park Liberty Park, Spokane’s second municipal park was deeded to the


Coeur d’Alene Park, 1900 (MAC, Libby L87-1.229)


has at last settled himself to the undertaking, and the result is that our local surveyor, Mr. Maxwell, has just completed a handsome plan of the addition. Mr. Browne is kept busy selling these lots, the demand for which surpasses all understanding.” He also set aside a large plat of land containing several acres, where he intended to build his house. The location of Browne’s Addition attracted the more affluent. It had


the first streetcar line of Spokane Falls, the horse-drawn line that traveled from downtown Spokane to the heart of Browne’s Addition. Its main function was to promote real estate development in Browne’s Addition. A selling feature was that the homeowner could go to work downtown


city in 1897 by F. Lewis Clark, one of Spokane’s wealthy real estate speculators. At the time of his donation he owned a considerable amount of land in that area. On June 11, 1898, an article appeared in the Morning Review, which


stated: “It is now Liberty Park. Yesterday the City Park Commission anonymously decided on a name and legally affixed it to the site.” According to the article, a petition had been signed by members of the community around the park, requesting it be called Liberty because of its location in the Liberty Park District, which Clark owned. It was also announced in that article that the park would be extensively improved that year. Under the terms of the deed by which F. Lewis Clark transferred the site to the city, the city was to spend $2,000 a year for three years to


Liberty Park wading pool (courtesy of Charlie Balzer)


148 SPOKANE CDA • May • 2011


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