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Learn more about the ‘red bus building’ ―A lot of people don‘t know what happens here,


charity centre known as ―the red bus build- ing‖ has welcomed a new manager who is


raising public awareness of the work they do. The Lemarie Centre for Charities on St Albans


Road is a not-for-profit organisation providing day centre and office space to local charities including Watford Mencap, West Herts Against Crime, Watford Asian Community Care and the Stroke Association. New manager Mark Evans believes that, alt-


hough the building is an iconic local landmark, people do not realise what goes on inside.


which isn‘t surprising as we didn‘t even have a logo until recently. This place deserves to be better and needs more than a facelift. I am en- couraging interaction between the charities here and trying to raise our profile. ―We‘re also hoping for some ongoing sponsor-


ship. I am the only employee and would love to at least have another part-timer working with me.‖ The centre has approached Mullany‘s buses


who are displaying posters promoting Lemarie on their buses. Lemarie volunteer Ian Port said: ―We are real-


ly pleased to have their support especially as we are a red bus and so are they.‖ Mark hopes a festival organised to celebrate


both the Queen‘s Diamond Jubilee and the Lemarie‘s Golden Jubilee will also raise their profile and fundraise for improvements to the centre. The festival will have live music, international


The Lemarie Centre, which is also known as “red bus building”.


food, activities and a raffle with prizes including tickets to Buckingham Palace and the Watford Colosseum. The charities will be represented at the event and also benefit from the proceeds. The festival takes place on Saturday, June 16, by Emily Ansell


11am to 4pm.


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