This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Advertorial


Driving energy efficiency through LED lighting


The government’s delay on deciding whether to enforce mandatory reporting on businesses’ greenhouse gas emissions has created some uncertainty in the business community. Regardless of whether new policies are enforced, businesses should already be taking significant steps to reduce their energy consumption, to cut costs and minimise their carbon footprint.


Making the switch to LED lighting


Changes to indoor and outdoor lighting have already produced significant energy and cost savings for organisations such as retailers, offices and public spaces such as museums, through installing the appropriate lighting controls, influencing staff behaviour with simple actions such as turning off the lights in empty rooms, and replacing older light bulbs with more energy efficient models. However, there are new opportunities now available on the market that businesses may not be aware of, or do not fully see the benefits of; and that is LED lighting.


Switching to light-emitting diode (LED) lighting can offer substantial energy and cost savings. Not only do these light bulbs last up to 20 times longer than traditional bulbs, they also save up to 80% on energy usage compared to less efficient Halogen or incandescent lamps.


As light bulbs need to be changed less often, fewer need to be purchased, and far less frequently. The cost of getting workmen in to replace lighting in high or difficult to reach places or after opening hours in public buildings or shop floors is also greatly reduced.


The environmental and financial benefits of LED lighting have become so apparent that


Toshiba stopped manufacturing general incandescent lamps altogether last year, focusing purely on its LED business. A modern approach to one of Europe’s oldest art museums


The Louvre Museum is one of Europe’s oldest art museums and was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1991. Along with its history and traditions, the museum takes its environmental responsibilities very seriously. Therefore, as the Louvre’s conventional exterior lighting reached the end of its life, Henri Loyrette, President of the Louvre museum, recognised the value of replacing the old, high-energy xenon lighting with energy-efficient LEDs.


The Louvre worked with Toshiba to find a solution. Toshiba developed specific LED solutions perfectly adapted to the Louvre museum in terms of colour, heat and flat designs. In total, Toshiba provided 3,200 LED light fittings to replace 4,500 xenon lighting fittings to illuminate the Pyramid and the palace


walls. The installation has been specifically designed to bring out the intrinsic beauty of the museum, whilst also generating outstanding energy saving and maintenance results for the Louvre.


Now complete, the new LED lighting has cut annual power consumption for the exterior lighting by 73%, from 392,000 to 105,000 watts.


Regardless of whether the government does make a decision on carbon reporting, UK businesses should embrace the opportunity to save money and deliver environmental benefits, and LED lighting is just one of many significant steps they can take to achieve this.


For more information on the benefits of LED lighting, please contact Edward Lees, Marketing Manager, Toshiba Lighting Systems UK, 01932 841 600, lighting.sales@toshiba.co.uk


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84