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Opposite Page: Lights from John Cullen help create the perfect balance. Below Left: A bedroom created by Bruce Munro accentuates key features. Below Right: An example of desk lighting; Rushton Beales of Lighting Design House believes in lighting task area’s first. Far Below: Cama reading light from John Cullen.


focal point for the room. “Depending on the scale of the room a feature light could not only add interest but look beautiful. Kinetic lighting can be very soothing and relaxing, and can be designed to enhance the architectural features of the bedroom.” Mary Rushton Beales, Founder of Lighting Design House, believes that bedroom lighting needs to be adaptable; “Whether in a home or a hotel the lit environment for a bedroom needs to answer many moods”. One day the bedroom will be used for chilling out and reading in, and then another day users might be getting ready for a big night out, so the lighting has to be flexible enough to suit moods of relaxation and excitement accordingly. “To build up an attractive lit picture that works, I believe the best approach is to light any task areas first locally e.g. glare free reading lights at the bedside, soft glowing light near the mirror for dressing or make up and low level floor lights.” Continues Rushton Beales. “After that, some soft background lighting techniques can be introduced by illuminating carefully placed artwork, low level lamps or indirect lighting features such as light behind landscape displays, or glowing shelves.”


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For Rushton Beales, the importance of lighting in the bedroom extends far beyond creating an aesthetic balance; “I’ve got a personal interest in the effect of light on the body and in the course of my research into this subject I have found out that quality of sleep is actually vital to health – the World Health Organisation has defined disruption of the body clock as a probable cancer cause – so actually the dark is just as important as light in a bedroom.” Light quality can seriously alter sleep patterns, and so considerations need to be made to ensure that sleep is as comfortable as possible.


“I advise all my clients to sleep in the dark or in eyeshades, not to work late on the laptop or fall asleep with the telly on. Research has shown that once we are asleep, even low levels of white light can confuse our cells into waking up, a sure recipe for messing about with our circadian rhythms and disturbing our sleep. Certain wavelengths of light are neutral to our sleeping body (red, amber) so if a night light is needed they should be in that colour of light” concludes Rushton Beales.


Contact


John Cullen Lighting T: +44 (0)207 371 5400 www.johncullenlighting.co.uk


Bruce Munro T: +44 (0)1985 845 228 www.brucemunro.co.uk


Lighting Design House T: +44(0)208 572 3852 www.lightingdesignhouse.com


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