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Martin Professional have been hard at work across the globe putting together installations for Svalbard and Jamaica (below left).


Below Right: LDI focus on the wonders of Marrakech for the Four Seasons Hotel.


contacted to create a lighting scheme that would release the building from its winter obscurity.


Gusche chose the Martin Professional Exterior 400 RGBW LED wash light to simulate natural sunlight onto the building, complete with the colour temperature changes that would normally occur from dawn to dusk. Beginning at 6:15 am in a subtle moonlight blue, a natural colour of light for that environment, light then morphs into a cold bright white by mid-day before ending in a late evening orange at 11:00 pm. The Exterior 400 fixtures are mounted onto wooden poles that have been hammered into the ground (there’s no need for concrete in a permafrost environment) and stand about 10 meters from the building. The fixtures withstand an Arctic tundra climate of wind, rain, snow and sleet with an average high temperature of -13 C in February and -30 to -40 C not uncommon.


This installation shows the robust capabilities that a fixture needs to have in order to be suitable for international use. Extremes of hot and cold found across the


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world are just one of the issues that a truly universal company needs to consider. Another is a question of cultural taste, which plays an important role in the design of lighting installations across the globe. Lighting Design International was called upon to enhance the appearance of the Four Seasons hotel in Marrakech to reflect the beauty of its location, which was a key consideration when designing how best to light the area. LDI wanted to play on the magical atmosphere in Marrakech, and so the lighting around the gardens was skillfully managed so that old olive trees and palms could be uplit by concealed fixtures.


A custom lantern was designed to light the paths. This used the latest LED technology rather then candles and played with lighting through a contemporary mesh to scatter patterns across the path. Playing with traditional concepts yet interpreting the solution in a contemporary way is a theme LDI have capitalised on throughout the hotel. Traditional craftsmen were involved in the process, helping to make all the decorative lanterns in the


arcade and throughout the hotel. These lanterns projected their wonderful filigree patterns across ceilings and hallways throughout the building. LDI worked hard on the design of the entire building to ensure that the hotel offered a real transformation for visitors into the wonder and mood expected from Marrakech. Traditional designs and techniques were considered throughout the planning process to ensure that the final appearance of the hotel, both inside and out, enhanced the experience for every customer. From Marrakech to Bahrain, where MA Lighting were delighted to be able to get involved in the “Path of Pearls” musical production. The Path of Pearls starts of “Manama, Capital of Arab Culture 2012”, part of an initiative launched by the Arab League under the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation’s Cultural Capitals Programme as a way to celebrate Arab culture. The production officially launched the event, which is dedicated to the promotion of cooperation in the region and


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