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President Darwin Green with his daughter Geneva, wife Antonia and son Michael.


negative is that it sometimes takes a while for a decision to be made. Everything is vetted through the board.”


Green said he wants to emphasize the club’s athletic roots, believing much of the past effort – both in time and capital improvements – have been focused on the club’s social side. “Athletics is part of what makes us the Multnomah Athletic Club,” he said. “That means we need to look at athletic facilities and pro- grams, and find ways to improve them. We need to assess the athletic community and the needs of 26 different sports. How do we meet the needs of the casual tennis player and a top-flight player? How do we make everything better?” Green also wants to tap into social media because so many younger members use those tools to communicate. That could also help members more efficiently plan how and when they use the club, he said. An issue that’s been


troublesome for many past presidents is how to deal with over-crowded parking. “It’s a big problem,” he said. “The average age of the club continues to be about 44.6, but the usage continues to increase each year. How do we handle the parking, and the increasing class sizes? We may have to think about offering classes later into the evening. Social media could help with that and let people know quickly what is happening here.” Interview over, Green left the Men’s Bar and headed down to the locker room to get ready to play squash.


“Being president is an honor,” he said. “And it can be demanding. I have a full-time job, and I guess that I spend about 20 hours a week on MAC business.”


He walked passed the Gallery of Presidents. “I’m ready for it,” he said. “Just like they were.” – MAC member Tom Hallman Jr. is a Pulitzer Prize- winning journalist. WM


APRIL 2012 | The Wınged M | 23


TIM GUNTHER


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