This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Are Cell Phones Safe? Q


uestions about how cell phones might impact our health have sparked signifi-


cant controversy. The World Health Orga- nization International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has now classified radio frequency electromagnetic fields as pos- sibly carcinogenic to humans, based on an increased risk for glioma, a malignant type of brain cancer associated with wireless phone use.


Caution was also urged in an article


about cell phone safety published this past October in the journal Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine. It reported that cell phones that are switched on and carried in shirt or pants pockets can exceed U.S. Federal Communications Commission exposure guidelines, and also that adults and children absorb high levels of microwave radia- tion from the phones. According to the paper, children are at greater risk than adults, absorbing up to triple the amount of microwave radiation in their brain’s hypothalamus (which links the nervous and endocrine systems) and hippocampus (vital for memory and spatial navigation) compared to adults. Absorption into their eyes was also greater, and as much as 10 times higher in their bone marrow than adults’. The IARC concludes that these findings call for cell phone certification consistent


with the “as low as reasonably achievable” approach taken in setting standards for us- ing radiological devices. “It is important that additional research be conducted into the long-term, heavy use of mobile phones,” says IARC Director Christopher Wild. “Pend- ing the availability of such information, it is important to take pragmatic measures to reduce exposure [directly to the head], such as hands-free devices or texting.”


Additional resource: Epidemiologist Devra Davis, Ph.D., reports on this topic in Disconnect: The Truth About Cell Phone Radiation.


C


QIGONG: A BOON FOR CANCER PATIENTS


Sweet Stuff Combats Infections H


oney’s use as a medicine was described on Sumerian clay tablets dating back 4,000 years, and ancient Egyptians made ointments of the sticky substance


to treat wounds. Now, contemporary scientists have shown that manuka honey, which comes from New Zealand, could be an efficient way to clear chronically infected wounds and help reverse bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Professor Rose Cooper, of the University of Wales Institute, Cardiff, in


the UK, has investigated how manuka honey interacts with bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Group A Streptococcus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). She discovered that the honey interfered with their growth, blocking the formation of biofilms that can wall off such bacte- ria from antibiotic remedies.


ancer patients that regularly practiced qigong, a 5,000-year-old combination of gentle exercise and meditation, for almost three months experienced signifi- cantly higher levels of well-being, improved cognitive functioning and less inflammation, compared to a control group. Dr. Byeongsang Oh, a clinical senior lec- turer at the University of Sydney Medical School, in Australia, who led the study, says the reduced inflammation in patients that practiced medical qigong, a form of Traditional Chinese Medicine, was particularly significant. The project involved 162 patients, aged 31 to 86; those assigned to the medical qigong group undertook a 10-week program of two supervised, 90-minute sessions per week. They were also asked to practice an additional 30 minutes at home each day. When the study began, there were no significant differences in measure- ments of quality of life, fatigue, mood status and inflammation between the in- tervention and control groups. However, “Patients that practiced medical qigong experienced significant improvements in quality of life, including greater physical, functional, social and emotional well- being, while the control group deterio- rated in all of these areas,” reports Oh. He remarks that the study is the


first such trial to measure the impact of medical qigong in patients with cancer. “Several studies have indicated that chronic inflammation is associated with cancer incidence, progression and even survival,” Oh explains. He presented the findings at a recent American Society of Clinical Oncology conference.


natural awakenings


April 2012


7


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32