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MARCH/APRIL 2012 Vol. 42, Issue No. 7 ISSN: 1209-3955 Price $3.95


Dwight Duncan to Cost Ontario 60,000 Jobs With OLG Gamble


Toronto - The Gov- ernment of Ontario’s plan to cancel the OLG Slots at Racetrack Program will prove costly, the President of the Ontario Horse Rac- ing Industry Association (OHRIA) is warning. Ontario’s horse racing industry employs over 60,000 Ontarians, supports rural Ontario economies by spending more than $2 bil- lion a year, and generates $1.1 billion per year in slot machine profits for the Government of Ontario. “We find it deeply irresponsible that the Min- ister of Finance plans to throw 60,000 Ontarians out of work and add $1.1 bil- lion dollars a year to Ontario’s deficit. That is just what he will do if the OLG Slots at Racetrack Program is cancelled,” said Sue Leslie, President of OHRIA.


The OLG Slots at Continued on Page 2


Photo by David Reid, DR Photos - www.drphotos.ca/gallery/ajax-downs/


What Will It Take To Save The Horse Racing Industry?


By Janice Wright


Once upon a time in the late 1990s’ the Ontario Horse Racing Industry Association (OHRIA) entered into a 3 way rev- enue sharing agreement with the government owned Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation (now the OLG) and the munici- palities hosting racetracks in Ontario.


fits for all three parties — and it would begin with the existing facilities of Wood- bine and Mohawk.


The goal of the accord was to permit the placement of OLG slot machines in privately owned horse racetrack facilities that were already operating in Ontario. For the government, signing the accord would allow them to introduce legal gambling to Ontario while saving the massive expense of building and maintaining their own facilities. And it could all be done without having to gain public and municipal approval to build gambling venues in Ontario commu- nities.


The partnership was to provide economic bene-


Even with the “uh- oh” gut feeling that a com- petition between the two gambling options could ensue, racetrack facilities were hopeful it would draw more crowds back to live sport, considering the popularity of the sport of sliding coins into slot machines.


The agreement included a 25% share of the OLG slots revenue which would be divided three ways: 10% to the racetracks (used to offset the loss of wagering dol- lars and to pay for facility maintenance), 10% for the horse people (purse win- nings etc), helping to sus- tain the horse race indus- try, and 5% to the hosting municipalities. The gov- ernment would keep the other 75%.


After two years of debate and economic review, racetrack facilities welcomed the OLG. For


Western Rider Section Page 7


obvious reasons — and rightly so — there was a fair share of backlash from the host municipalities and public from the beginning. To be accepted, it was cru- cial that the municipalities and public understood how the shared revenue was used. The agreement was signed and the “Slots at Racetracks Program” was launched. Hearing the gov- ernment had saved Ontari- ans the enormous costs of construction brought relief to disgruntled tax payers who could now put down the rotten tomatoes.


Lo and behold, time raced on and now over a decade later the tables have turned. There are now slot machines in all 17 facilities in Ontario. Sadly, OLG’s resort casinos have not been doing as well, having lost money millions of dol- lars year after year. In con- trast the “Slots at Race- tracks Program” partner- ship gained value having returned billions of dollars in revenue. This highly successful program not


only allows the horse rac- ing industry to sustain itself — it continues to provide economic benefits to the rural communities with the government col- lects $1.1 billion annually to support its’ programs. Could it be possible that our Finance Minister, Dwight Duncan, is unin- formed about the facts of the partnership program, and has therefore conclud- ed that the horse racing industry share of the pro- gram is a “subsidy”?


Filipe Masetti Leite


Filipe Masetti Leite begins his


JourneyAmerica this June See Page 69


The Rider


welcomes the Ontario Paint Horse Club See Page 13.


Photo by Brinkhoff / Mögenburg


War Horse See Page 23


INSIDE


“We were gravely concerned when Minister Duncan suggested that ending the “Slots at Race- track Program” would save the government $345 mil- lion dollars. The Govern- ment’s own numbers show that the program actually generates $1.1 billion dol- lars for the Government” said Sue Leslie, President of the Ontario Horse Rac- ing Industry in her value4money.ca website, launch on March 2nd.


Continued on Page 2


Racing Partnership ...................4 Remembering ...........................4 Halton Place Cancels................5 Susan Dahl Column..................6 Ram Rodeo Banquet.................7 WHAO News ...........................8 OEF Supports Racing...............9 ORHA News ..........................10 OBRA News...........................11 OPHC News...........................13 Fitness.....................................14 OTRA News...........................16 MWHS 35th ...........................20 War Horse ..............................23 Cedar Run Rodeo ...................30 Coming Events.......................31 ORCHA News........................33 NBHAC News........................34 GFHC News...........................36 AQHA Director’s Report .......37 OQHA News..........................38 Tanya Patterson......................39 AREA 3 News........................40 EOQHA News........................41 QROOI News.........................42 Value 4 Money.......................42 Check Your Facts...................43 Area 1 35th.............................45 Groom One.............................47


KingRidge Stables..................49 EC Coaching Awards.............50 Dressage Canada Judges ........51 The Hayes Family ..................53 OnTRA News.........................54 Para-Equestrian News ............55 The Carriage Driver ...............56 Lynn Palm ..............................57 Meredith Manor......................58 Horse of the Year Award .......58 Cedar Run...............................60 Dressage Riders Victorious....61 Equine Code of Practice.........61 The Insurance Guy .................62 System Fencing 25th..............63 Tina Irwin Clinic ....................65 Equine Vet Tech Certificate...66 Outdoor Equine Expo.............68 Olympic Team........................71 Eric Lamaze............................72 Janie Greenberg......................74 Japan’s Horses Need Help......74 Equine Massage Therapy .......77 Dundas Valley Ride ..............78 Everything Equine..................79 Saddlefit 4 Life.......................81 Classifieds, Directories .....82-87 Real Estate..............................88 OEF Youth Bursary ...............90


Material for the May 2012 Issue must be in our office by April 21st, 2012. Copy arriving after that date will be used in the June 2012 Issue.


email: barry.finn@shaw.ca or barry@therider.com, Visit: www.therider.com


Send to P.O. Box 10072, Ancaster, ON L9K 1P2 or call us at (905) 387-1900


English Rider Section Page 49


Quarter Horse Section Page 37


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