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CLINICAL: DIABETES


number of individuals with type 2 diabetes requiring insulin therapy is likely to continue to increase significantly in the coming years, all healthcare professionals involved in diabetes care have a responsibil- ity to address these anxieties and improve their understanding of why and when insulin therapy is indicated, and how it is initiated locally. NHS Diabetes are continually developing education tools and


resources to support healthcare professionals, utilise their website, and complete the safe use of insulin e-learning package.


‘The risk of weight gain is a common anxiety expressed by many individuals as a reason for not commencing insulin’


Make contact with your local diabetes team to explore what


training opportunities exist locally, and clarify referral pathways for commencing insulin therapy. Confidence and understanding is developed by exposure to


information and training. Initiating insulin isn’t easy, but it is a skill that can be developed by most healthcare professionals with the correct support and education. Commencing insulin therapy isn’t an easy decision for


individuals with type 2 diabetes, but is something that most can successfully self-manage with the correct education and support from primary care clinicians.


REFERENCES 1. Diabetes UK. Diabetes in the UK 2011/12 - Key Statistics on Diabetes. London: Diabetes UK; 2011.


2. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. CG87 Type 2 diabetes Newer agents (a partial update of CG66). London: NICE; 2009.


3. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Diabetes in Adults Clinical Quality Standards. Manchester: NICE; 2011.


4. Training, Research and Education for Nurses in Diabetes (TREND). An Integrated Career and competency framework for Diabetes Nurses (version 3). TREND; UK: 2011. Available at: www.trend-uk.org/ TREND_3rd.pdf


5. Training, Research and Education for Nurses in Diabetes (TREND). . Fit. First Injection Technique Recommendations. TREND; UK: 2010. Available at: http://view.themarketingbridge.com/?vcabid=hclSejcacSclg ahh&count=23/11/2010%2021:17:01-2.


6. United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Group (UKPDS 33). Intensive blood glucose control with sulphonylureas or insulin compared with conventional treatment and risk of complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. Lancet 1998;352:837-853.


7. Barnett AH. Insulin Made Easy. London Medical Education Partnership; 2001.


8. NHS Diabetes. Safe use of insulin e-learning package. Available at: www.diabetes.nhs.uk


9. NPSA. The Adult Passport to Safe Use of Insulin. Available at: www.nrls.npsa.nhs.uk


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