This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PROFESSIONAL


Amy Brewerton Editor, Nursing in Practice


Profile: Holby City clinical


nurse advisor Ever watched a medical drama and commented when they were doing something wrong? Meet the man whose job it is to do exactly that…


B


rian Earley landed his role in top UK hospital drama Holby City purely by chance. Having previously worked as a mental health nurse, a general nurse, a charge nurse, a senior nurse manager and even a medic on a North Sea oil rig, Brian’s varied career has taken almost as many twists and turns as a soap storyline.


Even the way he landed his Holby City role was unconventional. “I got involved purely by chance, it was one of those serendipi-


tous things,” explains Brian, 62. “My daughter, Alice, who was a midwife, spent two weeks as an


unpaid researcher with Holby to see where the BBC got, and I quote, ‘that utter rubbish they put in dramas about maternity wards’.” Alice called upon her father, now living in Cumbria, to help answer a


medical query which had stumped her and the other researchers. They needed to know how a CEO would relate to a chairman in an NHS trust.


“They rang me once, they rang me again, and then they rang


me again after that.” Quickly, Brian’s advice became indispensable, and he has been


involved in the drama ever since. The role takes up 6-10 hours a week, which he fits in around his various other roles, including charity, council and magistrate work. Despite admitting to not watching the show before becoming


involved, he now makes a point of never missing an episode. “I make sure I watch them so I can give feedback and say ‘well,


you didn’t take any notice of that’ or ‘that looks OK’ and ‘why are you still using the same masks that I’ve told you we don’t use’ – you know, that kind of thing.” Brian speaks frequently to the researchers on the show and


answers questions about what would and wouldn’t happen in real life. He also has input in the script, sometimes sitting in on writer’s conferences, sometimes reading the finished scripts prior to filming.


Above left: the operating theatre set that Brian helped on in Kiev. Above right: Brian (left) on set with Michael Spence, played by actor Hari Dhillon.


24 Nursing in Practice March/April 2012


www.nursinginpractice.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84