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NICE GUIDANCE


in evidence-based practice The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) regularly publishes advice on the management of a range of conditions in primary care. Read on for a summary of the latest publications…


Improving the experience of care for people using adult NHS services


In February this year NICE published a new quality standard and clinical guidance on patient experience within the NHS. Quality standards defi ne best practice across a topic area in


the form of clear, concise statements that defi ne aspirational but achievable care. The standards are tools to aid healthcare professionals in making decisions for their patients based on the latest evidence from NICE guidance and NHS Evidence accredited sources. Quality standards are for use right across the NHS in England. In the last few years there have been a number of proposals


and initiatives that have highlighted the importance of patient experience and the need to focus on improving this experience where possible. Ensuring people are treated with compassion, dignity and respect within a clean, safe and well-managed environment is paramount. The standard has a number of statements covering areas such


as knowing the patient as an individual; essential requirements of care; tailoring healthcare for each patients and enabling patients to actively participate in their care. Clinical guidance on patient experience was also published at It promotes person-centred care that takes into


the same time.


account a patient’s needs, concerns and preferences. It acknowledges the value patients place on healthcare professionals acknowledging their individuality and the unique way in which each person experiences a condition and its impact on their life. The quality standard and guidance are available on the NICE


website at: www.nice.org.uk/guidance/qualitystandards/ patientexperience/home.jsp and www.nice.org.uk/cg138


NICE updates epilepsy drug advice


NICE has updated its clinical guideline from 2004 on the diagnosis and management of the epilepsies. The update fully incorporates newer anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), which have emerged in UK practice and advises on the ketogenic diet. New recommendations include:


When possible, choose which AED to offer on the basis of the presenting epilepsy syndrome. If this is not clear at presentation, base the decision on the presenting seizure type(s). When prescribing sodium valproate to women and girls of present and future childbearing potential, discuss the possible risk of malformation and neuro-developmental impairments in an unborn child, particularly with high doses of the AED or when using as part of polytherapy.


Only prescribe buccal midazolam or rectal diazepam for use in the community for children, young people and adults who have had a previous episode of prolonged or serial convulsive seizures.


Administer buccal midazolam as fi rst-line treatment in children, young people and adults with prolonged or repeated seizures in the community. Administer rectal diazepam if preferred or if buccal midazolam is not available. If intrave- nous access is already established and


resuscitation facilities are available, administer intravenous lorazepam. www.nice.org.uk/CG137


NICE guidance: the latest


8 Nursing in Practice March/April 2012


www.nursinginpractice.com


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