This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
#5


tant to practice your designs horizontally and not just vertically. With teardrops, just let the stripe fade out at the end. One of the hardest parts of pin- striping is the turns; here you have to re- ally pivot the brush


and change your angle as you make a turn. Practice large curves to tight turns as seen in photo #5.


#6 #7


one color over an- other, but be care- ful; it’s a pain to correct mistakes. Consider this when beginning: let your colors dry between applications of dif- ferent colors. In photo #8 I’m now adding a third color to the design. Another type of striping design work is known as scrolls (which


#9


were very popular in the ’70s and ’80s and throughout history for that matter). To paint scrolls you don’t use a striping brush but rather a fine lettering quill. I get mine from Dick Blick and they’re the Eclipse Scrolling Brushes. As you can see in photo #9 I begin with the teardrop stroke and loop it around into a decorative scroll or- nament. In photo #10 you can see how I’ve taken the scroll ele- ments and looped them together into a multi-color ornate scroll design. At this point I recommend


#10 To build symmetrical designs, simply draw out a light grid pattern


first. Then starting from the cen- terline paint a center teardrop, and if you’re right-handed build the design painting the left side first, then do the right side, this will enable your eye to see the completed element as you do its mirror image on the opposite side. In photo #6 you see me using this method to begin a de- sign. More than one color can be applied when doing designs, see photo #7. Normally, use your lighter color first and follow up with darker colors. You can paint


#8


practice, practice, practice and more practice. Keep in mind, the more you do it the better it will come out.


Wide Open 83


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108