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of the rest of the bike is an eclectic mix of antique parts modified for a new function. The oil tank began its life as a 1925 Pyrene fire extinguisher. The seat is a Brooks bicycle seat circa 1918. The cool brake lamp hails from the 1930s, and the headlamp is a 1950 Unity tractor lamp. The fuel cap is actually a 1930 Dodge radiator cap. If that isn’t enough unique features for you, the jockey shift knob wears a 1936 Nazi coin and the neutral switch on the transmission wears a 1939 Nazi coin. I bet you don’t find those just sitting around anywhere. The winner for the oldest part on the bike though is held by the jockey shift knob itself. Believe it or not, the knob is fashioned from a 15 million-year-old piece of mam- moth ivory. That’s right, fifteen with six zeroes after it! All in all this is one gorgeous bike. Jan Knobbe and the crew at Chariots of Fire Customs in Moscow


Mills, Missouri are tasked with housing and maintaining the bike for Rodney. As with many trick-looking show bikes like this one, I am always skeptical as to whether it is actually a decent running and ride- able machine or just another two-wheeled sculpture. Jan reassured me this bike runs and rides great, and I trust him, so that is another plus in my book. Any way you look at it, Rodney has a winner, that’s for sure!


Wide Open 35


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