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Specifications


Background Info: Owner: Steve Malley Brand Name: Thunder Cycle Design Bike Name: Tattoo Bike Year: 2008 Fab/Assembly: Thunder Cycle Design Chrome: Thunder Cycle Design Bodywork: Thunder Cycle Design Paint/Graphics: Thunder Cycle Design / Bonez


Engine Specs: Manufacturer: H&L Model: 131 Monster Displacement: 131 cubic inches Cases: Midwest Heads: H&L Pistons: Ross Racing Cylinders: H&L Flywheels: S&S Connecting Rods: S&S Fuel System: S&S Super G Exhaust: Thunder Cycle Design D2 Cam(s): Woods Pushrods: S&S Pushrod Tubes: Sumax billet


Transmission: Manufacturer: Baker Model: RSD 6 Speed Shifting: Foot Drive Side: Right Side Drive Primary Drive: BDL Case: Baker Gears: Baker


Frame: Manufacturer: Thunder Cycle Design Model: Single Side Swingarm Stretch: 6” Up & 9” Out Neck Rake: 47 degrees Motor Mount Type: Solid


Sheet Metal: Front Fender: Thunder Cycle Design Rear Fender: Thunder Cycle Design Fuel Tank: Thunder Cycle Design Oil Tank: Thunder Cycle Design


Front End: Manufacturer: Thunder Cycle Design Style/Type: Hydraulic Tubes: Thunder Cycle Design Sliders: Thunder Cycle Design Special Features: Inverted w/ Hidden Axle


Wheels, Tires, & Brakes: Front/Size: 24” X 4” Wheel: Renegade Tire: Metzler Brake Caliper/Rotor: HHI Rear/Size: 21” X 9” Wheel: Renegade Tire: 260 Metzler Brake Caliper/Rotor: HHI Drive Pulley: HHI


Accessories: Handlebars: Thunder Cycle Design Grips: Thunder Cycle Design License Plate Mount: Thunder Cycle Design


Mirrors: Thunder Cycle Design Headlamp: Thunder Cycle Design Brake Lamp: Thunder Cycle Design Seat: Thunder Cycle Design Gas Cap: Thunder Cycle Design Forward Controls: Thunder Cycle Design Foot pegs: Thunder Cycle Design Hand Controls: Performance Machine Gauges: Dakota Digital


18 Wide Open


2nd Place Best of Show Kansas City


Story and Photos by Loney Wilcoxson Our second place best of show bike at our


Kansas City show was built by a name you should all remember from the Discovery Channel Biker Build-Offs of a few years back. That builder is none other than Eddie Trotta of Thunder Cycle Design. This bike was Eddie’s personal ride until it was pur- chased by present owner Steve Malley. Steve was already the proud owner of a Thunder Cycle De- sign scooter, so when word reached him the bike aptly named the “Tattoo Bike” was up for grabs, he had to have it. While long bikes slipped out of vogue for a


while, based on some of the entries at our St. Louis bike show, they may very well be making a come-


back. If that truly is the case, Steve’s sweet machine will be able to hold its own with any new creation that comes down the pike. The bike features plenty of “get up and go,” courtesy of a monstrous 131 cubic inch Evo style engine from H&L. The billet beauties were known to routinely make 150 to 160 horsepower on the dyno. With that kind of horsepower on tap, the 260 series Metzler rubber on the back can be reduced to a smoking pile of rubber shavings in a hurry. A right side drive six-speed trans- mission from Bert Baker was chosen to receive the ponies from the engine via a bullet-proof BDL open primary drive. While Thunder Cycle Design may not have pioneered the use of a single-sided swing, in my personal opinion, their approach is the most visually pleasing. It looks like it belongs on the bike as opposed to some set-ups that looked like a cobbled together afterthought. The massive front end provides the perfect feel of balance to complement the beefy single


swingarm, while the all black finish doesn’t draw the eyes away from the stunning paint job. The 47 de- grees of rake kick the front tire out a bit but going with a 24-inch front wheel and tire combo, the rake ap- pears less than its actual number. Thunder Cycle’s in-house painter Bonez cranked out a string of impressive paint jobs, but I believe this bike may very well have been his Mona Lisa. The theme for the paint was tattoos, and that theme is dealt out in spades on this bike. While it would have been very easy to step over the line into overkill, the addition of the contrasting silver leaf tribal graphics serves to pro- vide a subtle counterpoint to all the vivid colors. Bonez laid down color everywhere possible on the scooter including the primary drive belt, the rear wheel hub, the handlebars, and even the chin fairing. Like all of Trotta’s bikes, the wiring, tubing and cables have been expertly hidden in the frame, han-


dlebars, and swingarm giving the bike a very sanitary look. In fact, the bike looks so clean at first glance you might think it is in need of completion. Steve’s bike was a great change of pace in a sea of bag- gers this year, and as you can see, it was very deserving of its 2nd place Best of Show finish.


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