This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
University High Street, OX1 4BH www.univ.ox.ac.uk 01865 276 602 U


niv is a medium sized college, so we are a close community and support each other more at every level than perhaps they do at some bigger colleges. However, we’re big enough to avoid a claustrophobic “everyone knows everything about everyone” feel! Both first and second years live in college, mean- ing we have more interaction and friendships between year groups than some colleges.


Univ is beautiful! You get the Oxford thing, liv- ing and studying in stunning quads and build- ings, but it’s not as imposing as some colleges in Oxford; you’re not going to feel like a tourist in your own home. The college, although peaceful, is right on the High Street and close to anywhere you might need to be, includ- ing the University libraries, exam schools and science buildings. It’s a two-minute walk from Christ Church meadow where you can relax in the sunshine, get away from the crowds of the centre and clear your head.


Univ provides all students with accommodation for the duration of their course, in college for the first two years and afterwards in ‘Staver- tonia’ in North Oxford. Rooms in college are spacious and comfortable compared to student accommodation at other colleges or universi- ties and rent is reasonable for Oxford at around


Undergraduates 400


Rent £900 per term


Library 24/7


Famous Alumni


Bill Clinton, Clement Attlee, Stephen Hawking


£900 per term. In second-year you can choose to live in shared rooms where you get your own bedroom but share a living area. Every room has a sink, fridge, a fast internet connection and a telephone and bathrooms are usually shared between three to five people.


There are a few kitchens dotted around college but most students eat their meals in Hall. This year saw the opening of our new buttery and the chefs are very responsive to our sugges- tions, meaning the food at Univ is of a very high standard. Brunch at the weekends is especially popular; maybe it’s the waffles or the scrambled eggs with salmon! For a more traditional experience there’s formal hall six nights a week which is three courses, waiter- served and gowns are compulsory. It’s great as a special but good-value evening for birthdays or visitors, and also a chance to get involved with Oxford tradition, which is a lot more fun than it is stuffy!


Meals are paid for with your university card on a pay-as-you-go basis and are very good value considering the variety and quantity - £2.30 for a vegetarian main course and just 50p for soup. The staff in Hall and the buttery get along with everyone and cater for all dietary needs.


Food


Formal hall is available six nights a week. You can also eat at the Buttery. All meals available on a pay-as-you-go basis.


Facilities


Bathrooms are shared among three to five and kitchen facilities are available.


95


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244