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etter known by its nickname, Teddy Hall (you’ll have trouble finding someone who refers to it by its full name) is a proudly buzz- ing College. Its students enjoy a reputation for getting out and about - making the most of their university experience without worrying too much about those college league table scores.


St Edmund Hall B


Having said that, year upon year Teddy Hall easily falls mid-table, not sweating it too much except on the sports pitches, the river, the stage or just the dance floor at the legend- ary bops. Teddy Hall isn’t just a party college, though - it’s arty too. In fact, it’s got the largest intake of fine art students across the University and as a result there are some stunning exhibi- tions to see and a very lively arts and culture scene.


A college not scared to make noise - you might hear Teddies coming out with their simple but effective ‘HAAAAAAAAAALLLLLLL!’ chanting, guaranteed to silence all rival sports specta- tors. Whilst at the annual Christmas Dinner, a slightly inebriated rendition of The Teddy Bear’s Picnic is likely to take priority.


The smallness of the Teddy Hall site, in contrast to its large number of undergraduates


Undergraduates 400


Rent £1100 per term


Library 24/7


Famous Alumni Terry Jones, Al Murray, Emma Kennedy


Queens Lane, OX1 4AR www.seh.ox.ac.uk 01865 279 700


– the second highest in the University – means that it’s impossible not to be familiar with most of your fellow Teddies.


Nipping out for a coffee, dashing to the pub in time for last orders or to Ahmed’s kebab van in the middle of an all-nighter are all possible due to the College’s enviable location on the High Street. The Norman church (which houses the library) and beautiful front quad are both reminders of the College’s past as a medieval Hall, allowing Teddies the rightful claim that, being founded in 1262, it is the University’s oldest seat of learning, despite not gaining offi- cial collegiate status till more recently in 1957.


The summer term always sees the graveyard fill up nicely with picnickers, Pimm’s drinkers and those wanting to sunbathe or simply revise against headstone headrests. As an outdoor space, it’s much more practical and conducive to relaxation than others – you won’t see many colleges with students sitting around strum- ming guitars in the middle of big front quads! Fortunately the graveyard feels more an exten- sion of the common room than anything else, albeit a prettier, sunnier, grassier extension. So you can see, Teddy Hall is clearly the best college in Oxford.


Food


All meals are available including brunch at the weekends and formal hall on Wednesday evenings. Breakfast and lunch cost around £2, while dinner costs about £4.


Facilities


Bathrooms and kitchens shared amongst ten. Some finalists have ensuites.


81


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