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St Benet’s St Giles’, OX1 3LN www.st-benets.ox.ac.uk 01865 280 556 I


t is the atmosphere of warmth, hospitality and academia that seeps through the door of 38 St Giles’. More than any other institution within Oxford, St Benet’s Hall resembles the old traditional Halls of study which were first set up when the University was founded. As well as being small and homely, St Benet’s is the tallest building on St Giles’, giving it one of the finest views in Oxford.


The Hall is proud of its ethos of generosity and hospitality, with the JCR providing beer to its members and hosting a large party at the end of each term – all for free. Students here soon become accustomed to fine dining and good company; guests are frequently invited to one of the three formal meals every week. These are preceded by sherry and canapés and followed by coffee which, in summer, is served in the beautiful garden with a round of croquet to ac- company. As well as breakfast, lunch and din- ner, the Hall provides tea from 3pm every day.


As an institution that is funded by the Benedic- tine community, there are several monks study- ing at St Benet’s. The community is certainly strengthened by living with the monks who play a key role in the life of the Hall. It may seem odd at first, but you’ll quickly find that they’re


Undergraduates 50


Rent varies


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Famous Alumni Anthony Kenny, Damian Collins, Basil Hume


not only very normal people, but are also in- credibly interesting, kind and accommodating.


Despite the small number of undergraduates, St Benet’s is far from indolent. The student ex- perience is very successful, both academically and throughout the extra-curricular activities on offer in the University. In recent years the row- ing team has consistently punched above its weight, bumping boats from colleges with ten times the number of students. Current under- graduates include elected officials in OUSU, the Oxford Union, the University Labour Club, station manager of the student radio and writ- ers for the student newspapers, among other achievements. The Hall also boasts members who have represented the University in rugby, karate, football and golf.


One of St Benet’s particular strengths is its common table. There is no high table, which means that first year undergraduates often find themselves sitting next to esteemed academ- ics. This ensures a closer relationship with the Senior members of the Hall, and particularly one’s tutors, than in many other colleges. St Benet’s will not just be your Hall for three years – it will be your home.


Food


Breakfast, lunch and dinner are avail- able in hall, as well as afternoon tea. There are three formal halls per week.


Facilities


All first years and most finalists live on site. Second years live out. About half the rooms are ensuite.


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