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St Anne’s Woodstock Rd, OX2 6HS www.st-annes.ox.ac.uk 01865 274 800


ounded in 1879 as the Society of Home Students, initially as a place to provide affordable education for women, St Anne’s was granted a university charter in 1952 as a women-only college.


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In 2009, St Anne’s celebrates 30 since it became co-educational, having first admitted men in 1979. The college now has a roughly even gender split. Today, St Anne’s is one of the largest undergraduate colleges in the university, but fortunately for its undergrads, it can house almost all of its students on-site. Particularly sought-after rooms are to be found in the newly built (2005) Ruth Deech Building, where every room is en-suite!


Among undergrads, the college is known for its lively socials, its strong sense of community spirit and 1960s architecture, which is best represented by the former entrance to college, and current Freshers’ building, The Gatehouse. The college is also proud of its college mascot, the irrepressible beaver, which holds legendary status with undergrads, and is immortalised in the name of the termly bog-sheet!


St Anne’s students are blessed with a satisfy- ingly well-stocked library – it’s one of the largest college libraries in the University and, since Hilary 2009, is open 24/7. Students also enjoy


Undergraduates 425


Rent £1050 per term


Library 24/7


Famous Alumni Polly Toynbee, Helen Fielding, Edwina Currie


24/7 access to the college IT room. Both these facilities are used constantly, especially when there’s an outbreak of essay crises!


As one of the most modern colleges in Oxford, St Anne’s considers itself one of the most for- ward-looking, and in the coming years it intends to expand its on-site facilities significantly with plans to build a new library and IT resource centre. This project is even more significant given that St Anne’s is situated opposite the site of the new Humanities centre which is be- ing built in the Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, just across Woodstock Road.


The college’s lively student body is home to many college-based societies, ranging from the St Anne’s Film Society, to the typical assort- ment of sports teams (both male and female), including Football, Cricket, Hockey, Ultimate Frisbee and many more!


Although about 5-10 minutes from the city centre, ‘Stanners’ (as they’re known) are spoilt for choice when it comes to eating and drinking out. The nearby district of Jericho is home to a wide range of restaurants, pubs and trendy cocktail bars- many of which are situated on the renowned Little Clarendon Street, which is only a two-minute walk from college.


Food


Breakfast, lunch and dinner are avail- able in hall Monday to Friday with brunch available at the weekends. Meals cost around £2.50.


Facilities


Accommodation is available to almost all undergraduates. Half the rooms are ensuite. Kitchens are shared between eight at most.


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