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Oriel Merton Road, OX1 4EW www.oriel.ox.ac.uk 01865 276 555 O


xford’s fifth-oldest college, Oriel was founded in the fourteenth century by the infamous Edward II and is located in a prime position just off the High Street.


There are three quads, a chapel, a traditional dining hall featuring the largest painted portrait of the Queen, and well-equipped library which is open 24 hours a day.


Accommodation is provided for all students, either on the main site, the adjacent ‘Island’ site, or at James Mellon Hall, a short walk away in Cowley. Many of the rooms are en-suite, and some flats are available for second- and third- years. Rent costs vary, and the rooms are ranked on a scale of D to A* so that each student can choose a type of room based on their prefer- ences and budget.


All meals are available in hall, but there are also a number of kitchens located throughout the college. Formal Hall, a three course dinner, is held six times a week, a rarity in Oxford. Both the meal and wine are heavily subsidised and of good quality, making this a highlight of Oriel life.


The bar is open every night and acts as a focal point of the college social scene. Bops take place here, and there is a pool table, dart board,


Undergraduates 304


Rent £800-1100 per term


Library 24/7


Famous Alumni


Thomas Arundel, Dan Hannan, Sir Walter Raleigh


and ever popular quiz machine. The JCR is a quiet and comfortable space for relaxing, and has an annexe often used for play rehearsals, parties and other meetings. Oriel also has a sizeable TV room with a Sky subscription, which is in high demand for big sporting events, but available to everyone.


On the extra-curricular side Oriel offers a num- ber of varied opportunities. Musicians enjoy a well-equipped music room, and the choir and orchestras are extremely active. An annual high- light is the Christmas concert in the University church. Many Orielenses enjoy drama, and a play, usually directed by a member of college, is held in the beautiful second quad each summer.


Speakers frequent the college societies each year, Phillip Pullman being a notable example in 2009, and there are enthusiastic philoso- phy, history and literature groups. The latter, the Ralegh society, is named after Oriel’s most famous alumnus, Sir Walter Raleigh, although Rachel Riley, the new Carol Vorderman on ‘Countdown’ is currently giving him a run for his money.


Oriel covers all the bases, from academic achievement to activities, and social stuff to sports and societies. There’s even plans in the next year to reintroduce a college tortoise.


Food


All meals are available in hall. Breakfast and lunch cost around £2, and dinner costs about £3.50.


Facilities


First and second years guaranteed ac- commodation on site, third years housed in off site college accommodation. Ensuites are available in most rooms.


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