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elcome to New College – ironically, one of the oldest colleges in Oxford (a source of amusement for many). As well as being a fantastic place to learn, New has some of the most beautiful buildings and distinctive fea- tures in Oxford – take a look at the Cloisters, where Harry Potter was filmed, or try clapping in front of the ‘squeaky’ garden mound steps.


New W


New College prides itself on its welcoming, friendly and laid-back atmosphere. Being a big college, it’s home to over 400 students of all backgrounds, beliefs and cultures, who work hard, but also know how to enjoy themselves.


Regular social events, garden parties and even lavish commemorative Balls are hosted within the College’s old stone walls, and being a college which spends a lot of money on its students, New can afford to have fun.


The College coffers are among the fullest in Oxford, which means the College can afford to support its students, whether this be academi- cally, with well-stocked libraries and tuition grants, or in their personal pursuits, with travel and sporting awards. New offers high quality accommodation and meals at very afford- able prices, and the hall meals are top-rated amongst Oxford colleges.


Undergraduates 420


Rent £1000 per term


Library 24/7


Famous Alumni Hugh Grant, Tony Benn, Angus Deayton


Holywell Street, OX1 3BN www.new.ox.ac.uk 01865 279 555


New College has a keen enthusiasm for sport, as well as a fine reputation for rowing; but there’s no pressure to be sporty, or even exercise at all (the common room’s Wii is just as popular a pastime). The College’s musical reputation is also widely renowned, with the classical orchestras, student-initiated bands and jazz groups. New College Choir is par- ticularly renowned – known as arguably the best mixed voice choir in Oxford, it provides a great opportunity for the more musically gifted students at New. There’s even a college newspaper that’s entirely student-written and produced. Facilities include the library, which has a massively popular DVD collection, and generally good accommodation, around half of the rooms are en suite and shared bathrooms are not excessively crowded.


There is no stereotypical ‘New College’ student – the atmosphere of the large college means that it’s easy to find like-minded people and make close friends, but still small and cosy enough that you can know nearly everyone.


For many, the college becomes a home away from home. If you want to know more, come to one of the many Open Days throughout the year, or find out more online.


Food


All meals are available in hall on a pay- as-you-go basis. To eat three times a day will cost you in the region of £10.


Facilities


Accommodation guaranteed for Fresh- ers, third and fourth years. Bathrooms are share between three to ten. Access to kitchens in available.


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