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Christ Church C


hrist Church is an impressive survivor of the English reformation, having passed from St Frideswide’s Abbey to Wolsey’s ‘Cardinal College’ to ‘King Henry VIII’s College’, emerging in 1546 as both a college and the cathedral of the diocese of Oxford.


With an active JCR, a huge number of undergraduates (around 450) and a strong enthusiasm for drama, politics and journalism amongst its members, multiple societies and sports clubs, Christ Church is an exciting, challenging and creative college in which to live and to work.


As the largest college in Oxford, Christ Church is able to provide accommodation for every undergraduate for the duration of their course. It’s renowned for having top-quality accommodation – the majority of rooms are oak-panelled and in ‘sets’, where two bedrooms join to a sitting room, shared with a friend. Generally when living in these old rooms, bathrooms are shared with four or five others. However, there is the option to live in recently renovated accommodation, in which en-suite rooms are guaranteed.


Rent is reasonably priced at £948 per term and food in Hall (college catered) is


Undergraduates 450


Rent


£948 per term Library


9am - midnight


Famous Alumni William Gladstone, Lewis Carroll


St Aldates, OX1 1DP www.chch.ox.ac.uk 01865 276 150


the cheapest available in Oxford, costing £2.05 for a three-course dinner every night. Unfortunately, there are no cooking facilities in college (there are a few microwaves around, and only toasters and kettles are permitted in rooms). However, with college food so cheap, it’s much more economical to eat in hall.


Christ Church library is one of the largest college libraries, and boasts particularly impressive sections for History and Classics, and is currently open until midnight. Academic focus is key to Christ Church and it manages to remain in the top five of the Norrington Table, while still maintaining a relaxed and enjoyable atmosphere for Christ Church undergraduates.


The list of famous Christ Church alumni reflects the intellectual ability and extra- curricular enthusiasm typical among the College’s student body, including names such as William Ewart Gladstone, Sir Robert Peel, Richard Curtis, W. H. Auden, John Locke, Sir Alec Douglas-Home, Anthony Eden, Rowan Williams, Albert Einstein and Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll). But don’t be put off by this slightly overwhelming list, as behind its imposing grandeur, Christ Church is an accessible college and an easy-going and vibrant place to learn.


Food


All meals served in hall. Reasonably priced.


Facilities


Guaranteed living in for undergraduates. Many en-suite rooms, others shared between four to five. There aren’t many kitchens, but kettles and toasters are allowed.


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