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to attend, are held regularly and are often well-attended.The CU provides a space where Christians can come together to bear witness to their faith and explore it through discussions and Bible study. All CUs are affiliated to the central Inter- Collegiate Christian Union (OICCU), an evangelical body that is a hub for Bible study and social activity. They meet together regularly for fellowship, prayer, worship and time studying the Bible.


Hinduism


HUM, the Hindu Society, provides reli- gious, social and cultural events for Hin- dus and Asian students in Oxford. HUM aims to cater for the needs of the Hindu, and by extension Indian, population in Oxford by providing a range of religious, social and cultural activities, from the Diwali Ball to Holi celebrations to carrom competitions. Their standing goal is to ensure that all events are of the highest quality and tailored to the needs of their members. HUM also tries to educate Hindus and non-Hindus alike in the main teachings and philosophy of Hinduism.


Islam


The Islamic Society (I-Soc) provides a focal point for Muslim students and staff. Activities and events range from Friday prayer and learning circles to football and dhikr, as well as socials, lectures and charity fundraisers. There is a dynamic and integrated Muslim community in Ox- ford city, with a beautiful, recently-built mosque and Asian cultural centre just outside the city centre and many restau- rants and shops selling halal food. There is also a Bangladeshi mosque and a Madi- nah mosque. All colleges provide vegetari- an food, and most accommodate students who wish to cater for themselves. During Ramadan, daily meals are provided so that students can eat together. MuJewz


is an apolitical student interfaith dia- logue group which aims to bring together Muslim and Jewish students in Oxford to celebrate the common ground the two faiths share. Their aim is to promote cul- tural and religious understanding through constructive and meaningful debate and activities.


Jainism


Young Jains Students Oxford is an organi- sation that encourages the discussion and exploration of Jain philosophy, spirituality and its practical importance to life in an open and friendly environment. Jainism is an ancient Indian religion based around the principles of non-violence, harmless- ness and reincarnation.


Judaism


J-Soc is the representative body for Jewish students in Oxford and Oxford Brookes. Along with the OJC (a syna- gogue and community centre), meals are provided every night, which is especially helpful for those keeping kosher. A Sha- bat dinner is held every week including a speaker (and chicken soup!) There is a Jewish chaplaincy couple in Oxford, who can help with any question, be it spiritual or practical.


The University is accommodating during festivals and shabas (e.g. when there is a clash with exams), and most colleges will support students in catering for their dietary requirements.


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