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n the city in which Oxfam was founded there’s no better place to get involved in charity work and volunteering. Oxford offers so many different ways get involved no matter what your cause you’ll be able to find a way to help.


nterested in people? Then Archaeology and Anthropology is for you! It’s essentially the study of people, past and present: how civilizations lived, developed cultures and interacted.


For those of you that haven’t had the chance to do something good for others yet now is the perfect chance. Everyone can work in one or two hours a week to teach an older person how to use email for the first time, write a letter objecting to a human rights abuse or harvest the carrots from a student- run allotment. Not only is it good for others to volunteer, the warm fuzzy feeling it gives you on top of the CV points and the amazing friends


I


Human existence is a large subject area but that’s what’s great about the course, its diversity. It incorporates bits of philosophy, psychology, sociology, geography, history, linguistics, physiology and more besides.


you’ll make along the way mean that the time you spend volunteering is some of the most worthwhile you’ll spend.The opportunities are diverse and this page won’t be able to list them all, but here’s a quick blitz through the sorts of things on offer.


The balance between Archaeology and Anthropology is fairly even within study. There are two archaeological and two anthropological papers in the first year. ‘An Introduction to World Archaeology’ covers topics like the beginning and spread of farming, and theories on the creation and collapse of states and cities while ‘The nature of Archaeological Enquiry’ covers topics ranging from dating techniques to conflicts between


in February. To find out more go to www. oxfordrag.co.uk.


If fundraising is what gets you out of bed in the morning RAG is the place to go. Last year it gave over £120,000 to charity! RAG raises money through social events, sponsor- ship challenges and street collections and gives its money to four charities each year chosen by the student body


Volunteering I


Archaeology & Anthopology


For those of you that haven’t had the chance to do some- thing good for others yet now is the perfect chance.


nterested in people? Then Archaeology and Anthropology is for you! It’s essentially the study of people, past and present: how civilizations lived, developed cultures and interacted.


Human existence is a large subject area but that’s what’s great about the course, its diversity. It incorporates bits of philosophy, psychology, sociology, geography, history, linguistics, physiology and more besides.


The balance between Archaeology and Anthropology is fairly even within study.


A variety of volunteering projects work with children and adults with special educational needs. Volunteers teach chil- dren how to cook, run activity evenings for young adults and also get involved in teaching and education.


don’t speak English as a first language. The elderly aren’t forgotten either with a handful of student-run volunteering groups working in the local community. Oxfordshire Conservation Volunteers, OxGrow and the Oxford Green Project allow the green fingered to grow their own vegetables and help with the upkeep of nature conservations. There are also op- portunities for youth work, music making and performing arts to be used as a tool for social change.


I


Those of you that want to campaign to make a difference in the wider world have a whole group of organisations that welcome new members all the time. Environmental groups such as OUSU’s Environment & Ethics Campaign rub shoulders with student groups of NGOs such as Amnesty International, UNICEF and Oxfam. Oxford students have also set up their own campaigning groups on topics such as HIV/AIDS, human rights in the developing world, international rela- tions and public health.


different methodological approaches; ‘An introduction to anthropological theory’ is pretty much what it says on the tin; and ‘Perspectives on Human Evolution’ covers the evolution through Australopithecus and Homo erectus et al to Homo Sapiens, and also looks at specific evolutionary aspects such as bipedalism and the start of ‘modern behaviour.’


Hands-on volunteers are spoilt for choice. Local schools take in volunteers for maths, science, geography and literature tuition in addition to helping children to read who


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