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Lauren Kreamer Second year


Magdalen College


I knew from quite an early stage that I wanted to become a barrister, but originally planned to do a Modern Languages degree,


followed by a law conversion course. This decision stemmed from my love of French and German, both of which I did at A-level, and the desire to continue the study of one or both of them. Upon doing some research, however, I discovered the Law with Law Studies in Europe course and thought that it would be perfect for me. Two years on, I know that I made the right decision.


Studying law is incredibly challenging, but alongside the heavy workload and com- plicated concepts comes a real sense of achievement and the awareness that what you’re learning is not only very relevant but really makes a difference. It’s a remarkably


You’ll quickly realise that Law is an intensely relevant subjecty. If you’re lucky enough to study Land Law early, then you’ll be well-prepared for tenancy nego- tiations with pesky landlords if you have to live out during second year. Also Euro- pean, Administrative and Constitutional Law give you a really thorough grounding in politics and public policy. So when the PPEists start nattering off about the US constitution, you won’t feel isolated, though possibly not interested.


The last thing that’s important to say about law is that you don’t have to become a lawyer after the degree. Many graduates have gone into teaching, the civil service and the stage. Nevertheless, within the law, the variety of practice ar- eas is huge, so no matter what your inter- est, graduate opportunities are superb.


varied and interesting course, made all the more so by the opportunity to spend a year abroad.


I do the same degree as those on the straight Law course, with the addition of French language classes in first year and French Law classes in second year. Third year, however, is when the LSE aspect of my degree will really come into play, as I’ll be spending it studying French Law in Paris, an amazing opportunity about which I’m ridicu- lously excited. There is also the option to apply for Law with German, Spanish, Italian or European law.


If the year abroad alone doesn’t convince you, it’s worth mentioning that Law with LSE is a very small course and you really get to know the others studying it. This means that you have a broader circle of ‘law friends’ than just those in your college, which is a real advantage – if only to reassure you that nobody else understands Quistclose trusts or the Roman Law of Delict either!


The First Year Lectures


c. eight per week Tutorials


Normally one to two per week Exams


Three written papers taken at the end of the year


Courses


Criminal Law Constitutional Law


A Roman Introduction to Private Law


Research skills programme 159


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