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Tunde Sowande First year Wadham College


Applying to Oxford, felt like the most daunting thing I ever did, since I didn’t know anyone going


there or who had gone. However attending the summer school event dispelled alot of stereotypes and myths for me surrounding the University and gave me the confidence in the end, to take the gamble.


History always seemed like the natural choice for me; with both the flexibility of independent work as well as the diverse nature of the course making it an excel- lent choice to study at Oxford. Honestly, it feels like a massive relief to no longer feel restricted in scope to a few topics at GCSE and A-level. Instead university has given me the platform to look at as well as specialize


Subject, where you choose one of around 20 topics to study in further depth with primary sources. In the third year, you will take a Special Subject, which is driven by a list of set texts and assessed by both a long essay and an exam. All History undergraduates then write a thesis.


You will have one or two one-hour tutorials a week, possibly a class, and a few lec- tures. Therefore most of your study time is spent reading and researching indepen- dently. In this respect, Oxford is one of the best places to study history, because its libraries and resources are so fantastic.


This might all sound daunting but it really gives you a chance to spread your wings and develop your own interests, which is important in a subject as diverse and wide-ranging as History. It is this which makes Oxford so distinct and such a spe- cial place to study it.


in periods of history which I feel genuinely passionate about. As a result I have become a far more able and polished student over the last term.


My favourite part of the course so far, has been the lectures. It’s really great to hear leading experts (many of whose books you are likely to end up reading) offer quick, concise summaries of major topics and yet still offer new, refreshing perspectives on particular events you’ve just studied in the past week.


Any tips I could offer, is to try to read around the subject and make sure the es- says you write are on areas you feel most confident talking about. Regardless of your background, the tutors are mainly inter- ested in your passion for the subject and academic potential.


The First Year Lectures


c. five per week Tutorials


Normally one per week Exams


Four written papers taken at the end of the year


Courses


History of the British Isles General History Historical Methods


Quantification (one of a choice of foreign texts) Optional Subject


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