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Jacob Haddad Second year Wadham College


I get bored quite easily and so I chose a course that would ensure constant va- riety, both within Engineer- ing, where we develop an


understanding in all disciplines, and in E&M where we look at really topical examples and counterexamples in a broad range of areas.


I’m taught with other students studying the separate subjects but sometimes this means I’ll get loads of work all at once. It does take up a lot of time but if you’re organised, there is still plenty of room for the all- important extracurricular activities. This year I’m living out with six friends from college, about a five-minute cycle from Wadham. We have a lot of fun and they all study arts or humanities, which lets me take my mind of work in the evenings.


ing the summer following third-year and the first term of fourth-year) and can be organised with any company a student is interested in working with. The downside of having to write a 20,000 word manage- ment report on the placement is offset by the unparalleled experience of working in industry, gaining skills and contacts and possibly even securing a graduate job if you impress.


Materials, Economics and Management


As with EEM, you can apply to read MEM either on entry or after your first year, and the first year is common to Materials Sci- ence. The relationship between MEM and Materials is analogous to that of EEM and Engineering, and MEM suits ambitious, hard working Materials applicants who’d like a more vocational, business-orientat- ed degree.


For the first year you only study engineer- ing, so quite a few people reading EEM choose to switch from Engineering once they’re here. At the start of second year you get to drop your least favourite area of engineering, at the same time as getting access to the business school, which boasts some of the best facilities (and lunches) in Oxford. The first two years of engineering are heavily theoretical. I prefer more ap- plied or even practical topics so I’m looking forward to the next two years. In fourth year I’ll complete a research project or place- ment, which I can do in either Engineering or Management.


Whilst it is hard work, a lot of people describe EEM as incredibly employable. I’m not yet sure what I want to do after university but luckily my options will be very open – whether I want to work in Engineer- ing, Consulting, Finance, start up my own business or do TeachFirst, I’ll have a degree that lets me.


The First Year Lectures


c. ten per week Practicals


c. five hours per week Tutorials


Normally two per week Exams


Four written papers taken at the end of the year


Courses Mathematics


Electrical and Information Engineering


Structures and Mechanics 135


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