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Controls


Healthcare - David Hart, Managing Director at CP Northern


With hospital buildings often being a 24- hour operation, energy consumption has traditionally been high, and they have relied heavily on employees turning lights off accordingly. Today, hospitals can benefit from lighting control systems that are daylight linked with passive infrared


presence and absence detection. It enables the hospitals facilities management to control how much lighting is used within their building, to set and control individual luminaires within areas to a programmable time schedule, or be activated on or off when personnel enter or leave rooms.


This kind of system is particularly useful for hospitals with large amounts of glass as part of the construction. It detects how much natural daylight is coming into the building and therefore reduces the artificial light needed to maintain a preset programmable lighting level, thus reducing energy consumption. Hospitals are also discovering that


through new technology not only are cost savings being made but lighting control can also play a major part in patient care. One example is integrating lighting control systems with discrete patient monitoring, installing automatically controlled bedroom and bathroom lighting systems interfaced with Nurse Call systems and bed pressure mats programmed to operate if a patient gets up or falls out of bed during the night. Nursing staff can also manually raise or dim the lighting in private patient rooms via remote control externally in response to any suspect patient activity.


Offices - Lee Bensley, Director for Office, Industry and Healthcare at Philips


With sustainability and carbon reduction higher than ever on the agenda, office developers are embracing green measures and seeing that ‘green’ buildings not only attract higher rents from tenants, but that they also enjoy higher occupancy levels. Intelligent lighting control systems are a key component of green offices, resulting in greater energy efficiency and a reduction in carbon emissions, whilst creating inviting and highly functional office


environments that have a positive impact on morale and productivity. With 75% of a conventional lighting bill wasted on light that simply isn’t needed, the introduction of an intelligent controls system leads to significant savings. Control systems are also capable of permitting users to tailor their work areas to specific tasks and accommodate future layout and occupancy changes. The ability to use wireless touch screen interfaces to adjust lighting has made controls even simpler to operate and more appealing, enhanced further by the facility


to adjust lighting remotely. Moving forward, we anticipate a transition in some application areas, with lighting controls migrating to one overall control platform that recognizes all facilities from lighting to temperature. In fact at Light+ Building Philips will be showcasing an open protocol system – LightMaster KNX - based on KNX, which will enable customers to truly embrace a total controls solution.


Contacts


Lutron T: +44 (0)207 702 0657 www.lutron.com


Multiload Technology T: +44 (0)20 7794 9152 www.multiload.co.uk


RIDI T: +44 (0)1279 450882 www.ridi.co.uk


ETC T: +44 (0)20 8896 1000 www.etcconnect.com


CP Northern T: +44 (0)1785 859900 www.cpnorthern.co.uk


Philips T: +44 (0)800 7445 477 www.lighting.philips.com


26 www.a1lightingmagazine.com


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